Change page style: 

Companion Explains "Chameleon" Supernova

May 3, 2006

For Release on Wednesday, May 3rd, 2006


Based on Anglo-Australian Observatory (Sydney Australia) Press Release

Contacts:

  • Helen Sim
    Anglo-Australian Observatory (Sydney Australia)

    +61(2)9372-4251(Desk)
    +61-4196-35905(Cell)
    hsim@aaoepp.aao.gov.au
  • Dr. Stuart Ryder
    Anglo-Australian Observatory

    +61(2)9372-4843 (Desk)
    +61-0419-970-834(Cell)
    sdr@aaoepp.aao.gov.au
  • Peter Michaud
    Gemini Observatory, Hilo HI

    (808) 974-2510 (Desk)
    (808) 937-0845 (Cell)
    pmichaud@gemini.edu

Using the Gemini South telescope in Chile, Australian astronomers have found a predicted "companion" star left behind when its partner exploded as a very unusual supernova. The presence of the companion explains why the supernova, which started off looking like one kind of exploding star, seemed to change its identity after a few weeks.

Credit: Gemini South GMOS Images, full Galaxy: Stuart Ryder & Travis Rector, inset Stuart Ryder

The Galaxy NGC 7424 as imaged with the Gemini South Mulit-object Spectrograph.  Inset shows field of SN2001ig as indicated by arrow.

Galaxy with Inset:

Galaxy Image without inset:

Full Resolution TIF | 60.35MB

Full Resolution TIF | 46.05MB

Full Resolution JPG | 6.18MB

Full Resolution JPG | 28.21MB

Med Resolution JPG | 283kb

Med Resolution JPG | 1.41MB

The Gemini observations were originally intended to be reconnaissance for later imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope. “But the Gemini data were so good we got our answer straight away,” said lead investigator, Dr. Stuart Ryder of the Anglo-Australian Observatory (AAO).

Renowned Australian supernova hunter Bob Evans first spotted supernova 2001ig in December 2001. It lies in the outskirts of a spiral galaxy NGC 7424, which is about 37 million light-years away in the southern constellation of Grus (the Crane).

The supernova was monitored over the next month by optical telescopes in Chile. Supernovae are classified according to the features in their optical spectra. SN2001ig initially showed the telltale signs of hydrogen, which had it tagged as a Type II supernova, but the hydrogen later disappeared, which put it into the Type I category.

But how could a supernova change its type? Only a handful of such supernovae, classified as "Type IIb" to indicate their curious change of identity, have ever been seen. Only one (called SN 1993J) was closer than SN 2001ig.

Astronomers studying SN1993J had suggested an explanation: the supernova’s progenitor had a companion star that stripped material off the star before it exploded. This would leave only a little hydrogen on the progenitor—so little that it could disappear from the supernova spectrum within a few weeks.

A decade later observations with the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope and one of the Keck telescopes in Hawai’i confirmed that SN 1993J did indeed have a companion. Ryder and colleagues wondered if SN2001ig might have had a companion as well.

Radio Light Curve Shows Lumps & Bumps

Radio observations also hinted at a companion.

Soon after SN2001ig was discovered, Ryder and his colleagues began monitoring it with a radio telescope, the CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) Australia Telescope Compact Array in eastern Australia. The radio emission did not fall off smoothly over time but instead showed regular bumps and dips. This suggested that the material in space around the star that exploded—which must have been shed late in its life—was unusually lumpy.

Although the lumps might have represented matter periodically shed from the convulsing star, their spacing was such that another explanation seemed more likely: that they were generated by a companion in an eccentric orbit. As it orbited, the companion would have swept material shed by the progenitor into a spiral (pinwheel) pattern, with denser lumps at the point in the orbit—periastron—where the two stars approached most closely.

Such spirals have been imaged around hot, massive stars called Wolf-Rayet stars by Dr Peter Tuthill of the University of Sydney, using the Keck telescopes. The bumps in the radio light-curve of SN2001ig were spaced in a way consistent with the curvature of one of the spirals Tuthill has imaged.

“Stellar evolution theory suggests that a Wolf-Rayet star with a massive companion could produce this unusual kind of supernova,” said Ryder.

If the supernova progenitor had a companion, it might be visible when the supernova debris had cleared. So the astronomers put in a request to observe with the GMOS (Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph) camera on the 8-meter Gemini South telescope.

When the time came to observe, the "seeing conditions" (stability of the atmosphere) were excellent. Just an hour and a half was needed to image the supernova field—and reveal a yellow-green point-like object at the location of the supernova explosion.

“We believe this is the companion,” said Ryder. “It’s too red to be a patch of ionized hydrogen, and too blue to be part of the supernova remnant itself.”

The companion has a mass of between 10 and 18 times that of the Sun. The astronomers hope to use GMOS again in coming months to get a spectrum of the companion, to refine this estimate.

Binary companions could explain much of the diversity seen in supernovae, Ryder suggests. “We’ve been able to show the chameleon-like behaviour of SN2001ig has a surprisingly simple explanation,” he said.

This is only the second time a companion star to a Type IIb supernova has been imaged, and the first time the imaging has been done from the ground.

A paper on the observations, “A post-mortem investigation of the Type IIb supernova 2001ig", co-authored by Ryder, University of Tasmania graduate student Clair Murrowood and former AAO astronomer Dr Raylee Stathakis, was published online in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society on May 2. It is also available HERE.

Acompañante explica existencia de Supernova "Camaleón"

For Release on Wednesday, May 3rd, 2006

Based on Anglo-Australian Observatory (Sydney Australia) Press Release

Contacts:

  • Helen Sim
    Anglo-Australian Observatory (Sydney Australia)

    +61(2)9372-4251(Desk)
    +61-4196-35905(Cell)
    hsim@aaoepp.aao.gov.au
  • Dr. Stuart Ryder
    Anglo-Australian Observatory

    +61(2)9372-4843 (Desk)
    +61-0419-970-834(Cell)
    sdr@aaoepp.aao.gov.au
  • Peter Michaud
    Gemini Observatory, Hilo HI

    (808) 974-2510 (Desk)
    (808) 937-0845 (Cell)
    pmichaud@gemini.edu

Utilizando el telescopio de Gemini Sur en Chile, los astronomos australianos han encontrado una prevista estrella “acompañante” que se había quedado atrás cuando su pareja explotó como una supernova muy poco usual. La presencia de esta compañera explica por qué la supernova, la cual comenzó pareciéndose a una estrella en explosión, al parecer cambió su identidad después de un par de semanas.

Crédito: Imágenes de GMOS de GeminiSur, Galaxia completa: Stuart Ryder & Travis Rector,sobreposición Stuart Ryder

La Galaxia NGC 7424 captada por el Espectrógrafo Multi Objeto de Gemini Sur> La imagen sobrepuesta muestra un campo de SN2001ig como indicado por la flecha

Galaxia con sobreposición:

Imagen de Galaxia sin sobreposición:

Full Resolution TIF | 60.35MB

Full Resolution TIF | 46.05MB

Full Resolution JPG | 6.18MB

Full Resolution JPG | 28.21MB

Med Resolution JPG | 283kb

Med Resolution JPG | 1.41MB

Las observaciones de Gemini, en un principio, tenían la intención de reconocimiento para más tarde captar imágenes con el Telescopio Espacial Hubble. “Pero los datos obtenidos por Gemini fueron tan buenos que obtuvimos nuestra respuesta inmediatamente,” señaló el investigador jefe, Dr. Stuart Ryder del Observatorio Anglo-Australiano (AAO).

El reconocido cazador de supernovas australiano Bob Evans detectó por primera vez la 2001ig en Diciembre de 2001. Esta se aloja en las afueras de una galaxia espiral, la NGC 7424, la cual se ubica a alrededor de 37 millones de años luz de distancia en la constelación de la Gruya (la Grúa).

La supernova fue monitoreada durante el mes siguiente por telescopios opticos en Chile. Las Supernovas se clasifican de acuerdo a sus características en el espectro óptico. La SN2001ig inicialmente mostró algunos signos de hidrógeno, lo cual la había clasificado como una supernova Tipo II, pero el hidrógeno desapareció más tarde, lo cual hizo que se calificara dentro de la categoría Tipo I

Pero cómo podría cambiar su tipo una supernova? Sólo una porción de estas supernovas, calificadas como “Tipo IIb” que indican su curioso cambio de identidad, se han visto alguna vez. Sólo una (llamada SN 1993J) era más cercana que la SN 2001ig.

Los astrónomos que estudian la SN1993J han sugerido una explicación: el progenitor de la supernova tenía una estrella acompañante que arrojaba material de la estrella antes de su explosión. Esto dejaría sólo un poco de hidrógeno en el progenitor – tan poco que podría desaparecer del espectro de la supernova dentro de unas pocas semanas.

Una década de observaciones posteriores con el Telescopio Espacial Hubble orbitando y uno de los telescopios Keck en Hawai’i confirmaron que la SN 1993J sí tenía una compañera. Ryder y sus colegas se preguntaron si la SN2001ig podría también tener un compañera .

La Curva de Luz en Radio muestra montículos y protuberancias

Las Radio observaciones también dieron luces sobre una acompañante.

Apenas descubierta la SN2001ig, Ryder y sus colegas comenzaron a monitorearla con un radio telescopio el CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) Australia Telescope Compact Array en Australia del Este. La radio emisión no se produjo de manera clara en el tiempo pero a cambio mostró choques regulares y socavados. Esto sugirió que el material en el espacio alrededor de la estrella que explotó – el que debe haber desaparecido en su vida más tardía– era inusualmente disparejo.

Aunque los montículos pudieran haber representado el material que periódicamente se despegaba de la estrella en convulsión, su espacio era tal, que hay otra explicación que parece más probable: eran generados por un acompañante en una órbita excéntrica. A medida que orbitaba, el acompañante hubiera barrido el material que caía del progenitor hacia un patrón de espiral (remolino), el que provocó que estos montículos se hicieran más densos en el punto de la órbita – periastron- lugar en el cual las dos estrellas se acercaron aún más.

Esos espirales han sido captados por los telescopios Keck, en imágenes alrededor de estrellas calientes y masivas llamadas estrellas Wolf-Rayet por el Dr Peter Tuthill de la Universidad de Sydney,. Los montículos en la curva de luz en radio de la SN2001ig estaban espaciados de manera consistente con la curvatura de uno de los espirales que Tuthill había logrado captar en las imágenes.

“La teoría de la evolución estelar sugiere que una Wolf-Rayet con una acompañante masiva podría producir este poco usual tipo de estrella supernova,” aseveró Ryder.

Si el progenitor de la supernova tuvo una acompañante, este podría ser visible cuando los desechos de la supernova se dispersen. Por ello, los astrónomos solicitaron poder observar con la cámara de GMOS (Espectrógrafo Multi Objeto de Gemini) en el telescopio de 8 metros del telescopio de Gemini Sur.

Cuando llegó el momento de la observación, las "condiciones de visibilidad" (estabilidad de la atmósfera) fueron excelentes. Sólo se necesitó una hora y media para captar la imagen del campo de la supernova—y revelar un objeto como un punto verde amarillento en la ubicación de la explosión de la supernova.

“Creemos que esta es la compañera,” dice Ryder. “Es demasiado roja para ser un parche de hidrógeno ionizado, y demasiado azul para que sea parte de una propia remanente de supernova.”

La acompañante tiene una masa entre 10 y 18 veces la del Sol. Los astrónomos esperan utilizar GMOS nuevamente en los próximos meses para obtener un espectro de su acompañante para refinar esta estimación.

Los compañeros binarios podrían explicar mucho sobre la diversidad vista en la supernova, sugiere Ryder. “Nosotros hemos sido capaces de mostrar que un comportamiento camaleónico de la SN2001ig tiene una respuesta sorprendentemente simple,” agregó .

Esta es la segunda vez que una estrella acompañante de una supernova de tipo Iib ha sido capturada en imagines, y es la primera vez que se ha hecho desde la Tierra.


Un paper de las observaciones, “A post-mortem investigation of the Type IIb supernova 2001ig", de los autores Ryder, Clair Murrowood , estudiante egresado de la Universidad de Tasmania y el ex astrónomo del AAO Dr Raylee Stathakis, se publicó online en el Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society del 2 de May. También esta disponible HERE.