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Documents

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Please find here extended information and documents about GPI.

Citations

The primary references to be cited by users of GPI are:

Design Reference Documents

The following two design documents contain a wealth of information on the instrument, its capabilities and modes.

GPI Data Reduction

Our team published a series of ten papers at the 2014 SPIE Astronomical Telescopes & Instrumentation meeting discussing in detail our understanding of GPI data and its analysis as of six months after first light. Readers are strongly encouraged to take a look!

Below follows a list of recent papers showing the latest developments in GPI Pipeline and postprocessing developments:

 

Project Web Pages


GPI Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Can I observe a target fainter than I magnitude 9 by using a nearby bright star as the AO star?

A: No, the basic principle with the GPI AO system is that the science target IS the AO star, thus the science field is centered on the guide star.

Q: Can I observe close similar magnitude binaries?

A: No,  the AO system is designed such that any close similar magnitude binary would have a strong adverse impact on the AO performance, and possibly not even allow the closing of the AO loop.

Q: What is the airmass limit of the instrument as the OCDD (pg 39) says there's a 50-deg zenith limit?

A: The contrast curves should be generally good to about 30 degrees off zenith - there are no separate models for the 50 degree case. To first order, contrast would scale up as airmass ^12/5, but the performance is NOT guaranteed for Zenith distances larger than 50 degrees. Any proposal applying for Zenith distances larger than 50 degrees should take contact with the instrument scientist previous to submitting the proposal. The ADC is specified to work up to ZD=50 and thus both OIWFS performance is not guaranteed AND the centering of the science object on the coronographic mask will be adversely affected for large Zenith angles. 

Q: What is the AO Guide Star magnitude limit of the instrument?

Q: Can I observe targets that are Imag > 9.0 in better-than-median seeing?

A: Testing has shown that with slower camera rates it will work at decreased performance at I=9+. However, it is unlikely that the performance would improve in IQ20 conditions, because GPI isn't designed to run slowly to take advantage of slow seeing. Further, performance at I=9+ would be very sensitive to the read noise on the wavefront sensor, and is thus a complex undertaking. One should always refer to the "Instrument Performance pages" for the latest updates to the limiting magnitudes. 

Q: Do I need PSF stars for Polarization observations? 

A: In the polarization mode you don't need to observe PSF reference stars, because the two orthogonal polarizations essentially serve as each other's PSFs, though one can contemplate using some other form of PSF subtraction if you want to obtain a total intensity image as a followup characterization observation. 

Q: Can I do dithering?

A: The only dithering possible is going off to take sky frames (for K1 and K2 bands) in open loop. There is NO capability to dither on the detector with closed OIWFS loops.  

Q:Can GPI keep the sky fixed on the detector?

A:NO, the masks in the instrument are fixed orientation and optimized with respect to a fixed Cassegrain angle. With the Cassegrain angle always fixed (and not adjustable) it means that the sky will always rotate around the detector optical axis determined by the OIWFS axis.   

Q:Can I mix different observing modes in the same observation?

A:NO, each observing mode requires its own set of internal calibrations and thus each observing mode setup requires its own acquisition. Even a change of filter is its own observing mode so no mixing of filters in the same observation.   


GPI Acronyms

ADC Atmospheric Dispersion Corrector or Analog to Digital Converter  (Depends on context)
ADI Angular Differential Imaging
AEOS Advanced Electro-Optical System (USAF Telescope on Maui)
AGB Asymptotic Giant Branch
ALMA Atacama Large Millimeter Array
ATEUI Acceptance Test and Engineering User Interface
ALTAIR ALTitude-conjugate Adaptive optics for the InfraRed
AMNH American Museum of Natural History
AO Adaptive Optics
AOC Adaptive Optics Computer
API Application Programming Interface
APLC Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraph
AR Anti Reflection (coating for tranmissive elements)
AU Astronomical Unit (1.495 X 1011 m)
ATP Acceptance and Test Plan
AURA Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy
CAL Calibration Subsystem
CANOPUS The optical bench and associated electronics. Everything that is within the box attached to the ISS. Other subsystems of GeMS include the BTO (Beam Transfer Optics), the laser and LSE (Laser Service Enclosure) and the LLT (Laser Launch Telescope).
CCB Change Control Board
CCIT Coherent Communications, Imaging and Targeting
CCC Closed Cycle Coolor (CCR)
CCR Closed Cycle Refrigerator (CCC)
CDR Critical Design Review
CEH Command Event Handler (GPI interface to GIAPI)
CfAO Center for Adaptive Optics
CFHT Canada France Hawaii Telescope
CGS Centimeter gram second system of units
CoDR Conceptual Design Review
CoPI Co-Principal Investigator
CoPM Co-Project Manager
COR Coronagraph
CP Cerro Pachon
CVNDF Continuously Variable Neutral Density Filter
CWS Cold Working Surface
d Subaperture size projected on the primary mirror (18 cm for GPI)
D Telescope primary mirror diameter (8.0 m for Gemini)
DAC Digital to Analog Convertor
DAR Differential Atmospheric Refraction
DARPA Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency
DD Double (image) difference
DHS Data Handling System
DM Deformable Mirror
DMS Document Management system
DRP Data Reduction Pipeline
EFS External Frame Structure
EPICS Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System
ESO European Southern Observatory
ESO VLT European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope
EXAOC Extreme Adaptive Optics Coronagraph (original name for GPI)
FDRP Final Data Reduction Pipeline
FEA Finite Element Analysis
FITS Flexible Image Transport System
FOV Field Of View
FPRD Functional and Performance Requirements Document
FPM Focal Plane Mask
FSM Fine Steering Mirror
FSS Flexure Sensitive Structure
FTR Fourier Transform wavefront Reconstructor
FWHM Full Width at Half Maximum
GCAL Gemini Facility Calibration Unit
GDSN Gemini Data Storage network
GeMS Gemini MCAO System
GLAO Ground Layer Adaptive Optics
GMOS Gemini Multi Object Spectrograph
GMP Gemini Master Process
GPI Gemini Planet Imager
GPOL Gemini Polarization module (obsolete)
GSAOI Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager
HCIT High Contrast Imaging Test bed
HEBS High Energy Beam Sensitive
HIA Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics
HL High Level
ICD Interface Control Document
ICS Instrument Control System
IDL Image Display Language (RSI Inc.)
IFS Integral Field Spectrograph
IMF Initial Mass Function
INO Institut Nationale d'Optique
IR Infrared-Red
IRAS Infra-Red Astronomy Satellite
ISS Instrument Support Structure
IWD Inner Working Distance
JPL Jet Propulsion Laboratory
JWST James Webb Space Telescope
LAN Local Area Network
LAO Laboratory for Adaptive Optics
LLNL Lawrence Livermore National Lab
mas milli-arcsec (4.848 nanoradian)
M1 Gemini primary mirror
M2 Gemini secondary mirror
M3 Gemini Tertiary (or science fold mirror)
MCD Motion Control Daemon
MEMS Micro Electro-Mechanical System
MJ Mass of Jupiter (1.8988 X 1027 kg)
MK Mauna Kea
MWBS Multi-Wavelength Beam Splitter
MWI Multi-Wavelength Imager
N Number of subapertures across the primary mirror (44 for GPI)
NCP Non-Common Path
NDR Non-Destructive Read
NIRC2 Near Infrared Camera 2 for adaptive optics at Keck
NIRSPEC Near Infrared Spectrometer instrument at Keck
NRC National Research Council (careful, there is an American and a Canadian one, separate entities)
NSF National Science Foundation
NTP Network Time Protocol
OAP Off Axis Parabola
OCDD Operational Concept Definition Document
OCS Observatory Control System
ODRP On-Line Data Reduction Pipeline
OFC Optimized-gain Fourier Control
OIWFS On-Instrument Wavefront Sensor
OIWGS On Instrument Wave Front Sensor
OMSS Opto-Mechanical Superstructure
OSIRIS OH-Suppressing Infrared Imaging Spectrograph at Keck
OT Observing Tool
OWD Outer Working Distance
PA Position Angle
pc Parsec (3.085 X 1016 m)
PCS Primary Control System
PDR Preliminary Design Review
PE Project Engineer
PI Principal Investigator
Piezo Piezo effect actuator
PN Planetary Nebula
pnCCD pnSensor based CCD.
PM Project Manager
PPM Pupil Plane Mask
PS Project Scientist
PSDI Phase-Shifting Diffraction Interferometer
PSF Point Spread Function
PZT Lead Zirconium Titanate (Piezo effect actuator)
QE Quantum Efficiency
QPT Queue Planning Tool
RFP Request for Proposal
RMS Root Mean Square
ROC Radius Of Curvature
ROI Region of Interest
RPC Remote Procedure Call
RSS Root Sum Square
SC Science Camera
SCC Supervisory and Component-Control Computer (Obsolete, see TLC)
SCS Gemini Telescope Secondary Control System
SD Simple (image) difference
SE Systems Engineer
Seqexec Sequence Executor
SFWFS Spatially Filtered Wave Front Sensor
SNR Signal to Noise Ratio
SOW Statement of Work
SPIE Society of Photoelectric Instrumentation Engineers
SRD Software Requirements Document
SSDI Simultaneous Spectral Differential Imaging
SSD Speckle Suppressing Device
SSICD Subsystem Interface Control Document
SSRD Subsystem Requirements Document
STScI Space Telescope Science Institute
TBC To Be Confirmed
TBD To Be Determined
TCS Telescope Control System
TLC Top Level Computer (for GPI was SCC)
TMA Three Mirror Anastigmat
TPF Terrestrial Planet Finder
TRIDENT Three Channel Differential Imager for CHF Telescope
T/T Tip/Tilt
T/T/F Tip/Tilt/Focus
UCB University of California, Berkeley
UCLA University of California, Los Angeles
UCO UCO/Lick Observatory
UCSC University of California, Santa Cruz
UdeM Université de Montréal
USAF United States Air Force
VLT Very Large Telescope
WBS Work Breakdown Structure
WD White Dwarf
WFE WaveFront Error
WFS WaveFront Sensor
WIRCAM Wide-Field Infrared Camera

Historical

Everything below this point contain older information that isn't kept upto date. 

Accepted programs and status

GPI programs selected for Early Science Observations

The table below summarizes the programs that have been approved for GPI Early Science observations.

GPI ES Programs

SV Program ID

PI Name

Title

Band

Time Awarded (hrs)

Obs.Mode

Status 

GS-2014A-SV-401 A. Cheetham Hidden under the coronagraph spot: transition disk exoplanets at 5AU scales
1
1.25
Direct  Completed
GS-2014A-SV-402 L. Cieza Observing planet formation in HD 135344B with GPI
1
2.0
Coron-Pol, Coron  Completed
GS-2014A-SV-403 T. Currie Directly Imaging Exoplanets Around Early-Type Stars in the Sco-Cen Association
1
3.2
Coron  Completed
GS-2014A-SV-404 T. Davidge Shedding Mass While Living Large: Circumsystem Disks Around Massive Algol BInaries
1
2.7
Coron-Pol  Completed
GS-2014A-SV-405 M.Fitzgerald High Fidelity Multiband Imaging Polarimetry of the Iconic Debris Disk System HR4796A
1
2.2
Coron-Pol, Coron  Completed
GS-2014A-SV-406 J. Hashimoto Exploring the HD 142527 disk at planet forming radii
1
1.25
Coron-Pol
GS-2014A-SV-407 M. Reggiani Caught in the act: Confirming a young companion forming in the transitional disk around HD169142
1
1.5
Coron  Completed
GS-2014A-SV-408 R. Sahai Caught in the Act: Imaging the central disk and outflow in V Hya, an AGB star in transition to a bipolar nebula
1
1.5
Coron-Pol, Coron  Completed
GS-2014A-SV-409 G.S. Salter Detection and Spectral Characterisation of a Doppler Companion
1
1.2
Coron  Completed
GS-2014A-SV-410 P. Tuthill The origin of Z CMa's enigmatic microjet
1
1.75
Coron-Pol  Attempted
GS-2014A-SV-411 C. Melis Probing the familiar but strange planetary systems around HD 131488 and HD 121191
2
2.0
Coron-Pol, Coron  Completed
GS-2014A-SV-412 J. Monnier Imaging Planet Formation in situ with Gemini Planet Imager
2
4.2
Coron-Pol  Completed
GS-2014A-SV-413 V. Rapson Polarimetric Imaging of the Protoplanetary Disks TW Hya and V4046 Sgr
2
1.0
Coron-Pol  Completed
GS-2014A-SV-414 T. Rodigas The Circumbinary Environment of HD 142527 Revealed by GPI Polarized Differential Imaging
2
2.5
Direct-Pol  Completed
GS-2014A-SV-415 P. Rojo Investigating seasonal changes in Titan's meteorology through cloud monitoring with GPI
2
2.0
Direct  Partially completed
GS-2014A-SV-416 T. Ueta GPI-ES Investigations into the Circumstellar Shell Structure around the Bright Central Star of IRAS 11385-5517
2
1.0
Coron  Completed

Call for Campaign Science Proposals

This page is also available as a pdf document.

The Gemini Observatory is pleased to announce a Call for Proposals for GPI Campaign Science. GPI is a technologically advanced instrument designed specifically for obtaining images and low-resolution spectra of faint objects and/or features very near to bright objects. While GPI’s primary science goal is the detection and characterization of exoplanets, its high contrast capabilities will allow significant scientific advances in the areas such as circumstellar disks, stellar evolution (mass transfer), fundamental stellar astrophysics (binaries) and solar system objects.

GPI is expected to be available for science use in Semester 2012B.

Proposals

GPI Campaign proposals should embrace a large, scientifically compelling, and statistically significant investigation in the chosen science area that cannot be achieved through the standard proposal mechanism. Gemini will choose the most scientifically compelling proposal or proposals for scheduling.

As GPI will require median or better observing conditions to operate effectively, all successful programs will be executed in queue mode. However, the Observatory encourages successful science teams to plan on spending significant time in Chile during the commissioning and early science period, so that they can gain a full understanding of GPI’s performance.

We will consider programs that request from 200 to 1000 queue hours of telescope time, spread over a maximum of six semesters. (The GSC has recommended that the total allocation for GPI Campaign Science programs not exceed 1400 hours; the Board will approve the final allocation following proposal review.) A maximum of 180 campaign hours per semester will be scheduled as science ranking band 1. Proposers may request time to be scheduled in band 2.

The standard proprietary period for data is 18 months after acquisition of individual observations. Proposals may request and justify a longer proprietary period for specific campaign observations.

Proposals should address any necessary precursor or followup observations needed to accomplish the science goals of the program and describe how these observations will be obtained. Allocation through the Campaign will be for use of GPI alone.

Collaboration of teams from across the Gemini partnership is encouraged, and partner participation is a criterion by which campaign proposals will be evaluated.

Proposals must include:

  • a discussion of the primary scientific goals of the project;
  • a description of the experimental design, including sample selection, use of GPI, scheduling requirements, calibration, etc.;
  • a statement of the time requested by semester and by science ranking band;
  • a description of data products compatible with the international virtual observatory to be delivered, and the timeline for their delivery;
  • a management plan that describes staffing and resources available to complete the science program. The management plan must also describe
    • the expected contributions of each participant;
    • data management procedures, including access to data within the team;
    • who is responsible for submitting progress reports and final reports;
    • the process for redirecting the research agenda as discoveries are made;
    • the mechanism for routine communication among research team members.

The scientific justification of the proposal, including relevant figures and captions, is limited to 5 pages. The experimental design, including figures and captions, is limited to 6 pages. The required management plan is limited to 3 pages.  There is no page limit on references or target lists.

Proposals should be submitted via email to Gemini Deputy Director/Head of Science, Nancy Levenson, nlevenson at gemini.edu by 5:00PM HST on March 31, 2011 (03:00 GMT on April 1, 2011).

The Instrument

Details about the instrument and its expected performance are available in a separate document , and on the Gemini website. Please see the instruments section of the Gemini website, and current updates on GPI can be found at the external instrument site. Successful campaign proposers will be allowed to request minor adjustments to target lists and exposure times in light of actual on-sky performance of GPI.  Gemini will be responsible for evaluating and approving these changes.

Research Collaboration Agreement

Each successful GPI Campaign Project will require a “Research Collaboration Agreement” signed by all members of the team before the campaign starts and submitted to the Gemini Deputy Director/Head of Science. The requirements of this agreement are described in the separate document: Policies for GPI Campaign Projects.  The agreement should not be submitted with campaign proposals.

Program Review

Each successful GPI Campaign Project is to submit annual progress reports to the Gemini Director. These reports should contain (at a minimum) a summary of the observing time used thus far, comments on the quality of the data and whether the data quality is sufficient to meet the scientific goals of the program, a summary of the activities of each team member, the status of reduction of the data, and detailed plans for the next year of the project. The report should also indicate any preliminary science results arising from the project. Gemini and the GSC will assess these reports to determine if continuing campaign observations are warranted.

Early Science (SV) Call for Proposals

The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) commissioning activities started in November 2013 and continue during the first semester of 2014. The commissioning is expected to be completed during the 2014B semester. Therefore, we invite the Gemini community to propose Early Science (ES) programs for GPI. Approximately six nights are available in April during the 2014A semester for this ES call.

Proposal submissions are due FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28th, 2014, 23:59 UT .

The Early Science is way for the Gemini Community to get an early access to the instrument before it is offered in the 2014B semester. It is intended to be "end-to-end" testing, verifying the readiness of the entire system from observation preparation to data reduction. (The current version of the GPI IDL pipeline and data reduction package is now available from the instrument build team.) ES is also intended to exercise the instrument with a variety of observing programs and demonstrate to the community, through interesting and challenging science programs, the unique capabilities of GPI on Gemini South.

Commissioning is not yet complete, so performance information is preliminary and may not represent the final capability of GPI. All ES programs are undertaken in shared-risk mode. Updates will be provided as available on the GPI Status and Availability page, and notifications will be sent to the gpinews@gemini.edu mailing list, which is open to new subscribers.

Early Science proposals will be evaluated by the Gemini GPI Science Team including members from the Gemini Science and Technology Advisory Committee. Recommended programs will be forwarded to the Gemini Director for approval. Selection of ES programs will be done to ensure a wide range of types of target and observing modes. The different types of targets and approximate allocation times are given below. The allocated hours are notional only and will vary based on the programs selected. The proposed target observations must use the GPI Observing modes currently offered.

Available Observing Modes and approximate allocation times 
Observing Mode Allocated  science time
Coronography Y, J, H, K1 and K2 (IQ70CC50) 10 hours
Polarization Y, J, H, K1 and K2 (IQ70CC50) 10 hours
Direct Imaging or Polarization of Extended sources (i.e. any non-point source)  (IQ70CC50) 5 hours
Direct Imaging or Polarization with no accurate photometry needed (IQ85CC70) 10 hours
Non-sidereal(1) < 5 hours

(1) Observations of non-sidereal targets have been very limited to-date, so success of programs in this mode is uncertain.

The approved Early Science Principal Investigators will be responsible for providing written, in-depth assessments of ES observations within two months of data acquisition. The data obtained during ES will be made available to the international Gemini community after a two-month proprietary period, and information from the assessments of the ES teams will be published on the Gemini web pages. PIs of approved programs are strongly encouraged to provide manuscripts of results to Gemini in advance of publication, especially to allow staff to review technical performance of the instrument. Community participation will help to ensure that GPI is a success when the system is in regular use.

GPI is an extreme adaptive-optics imaging polarimeter/integral-field spectrometer, which will provide diffraction-limited data between 0.9 and 2.4 microns. The system will provide contrast ratios of 10^6 on companions at separations of 0.2-1 arcsecond in a 1-2 hour observation. The science instrument will provide spectroscopy or dual-beam polarimetry of any object in the field of view. Bright natural guide stars (I<9 mag) are required for optimal performance of the GPI adaptive optics system. GPI will be capable of detecting point sources down to H = 23 mag., with ≥ 5-sigma, in 1 hour (absent photon noise from a bright companion). For more information on achievable contrast, see the Contrast Page.

CONSTRAINTS

1. Target visibility: We expect to observe ES programs between April 20, 2014 and April 26, 2014. Therefore the targets should have RAs between 08 hours and 19 hours and Declinations between +10 degrees and -70 degrees (elevation > 45 degrees). Note that GPI OIWFS reaches its specifications for Zenith angles <30 degrees and it will work down to <50 degrees but with limited performance.

2. OIWFS Guide stars: GPI uses the science target for its AO correction and thus the science target must have a V magnitude brighter than 9 and not be extended objects to achieve the full expected Strehl.

3. Observing conditions constraints: The following constraints are allowed:

  • Image Quality(2): 70%-ile or 85%-ile.
  • Sky Transparency (cloud cover): photometric (50%-ile).
  • Sky Background: Any.
  • Sky Transparency (Water vapor content): Any.

(2) Reasonable corrections are possible under poorer image quality conditions (up to 1" natural seeing or IQ=85%-ile). Proposers that do not require high Strehl limited images are encouraged to submit targets for these conditions. Details about the contrast and Strehl ratios that could be achieved with GPI for different seeing conditions can be found in the GPI Strehl web page.

4. Target Duplication: The GPI Science Campaign target list is available here and any target duplication between the Campaign and any proposed target is subject to the Target Duplication Policy for GPI, which is available here.

GUIDELINES

To submit a program, use the 2014A Phase I tool and include observing constraints, target lists, and GPI Meta Mode configuration information. Be sure to select "Other Proposal Types" and "System Verification" in the Proposal Class and the Proposal Type fields respectively, inside the Scheduling and Time Request section of the Phase I Tool.

The overheads associated with a GPI science observation can be estimated using the information given in the Sensitivity and Overheads web page. Science time requests should include these overheads.

PHASE I ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS

Scientific justification must be less than 1000 words. The technical justification should be sufficiently complete within its 1000 word limit that program feasibility can be assessed easily. A statement of data reduction plans must also be included in the technical justification. Proposers may use other data reduction tools in addition to the GPI IDL package. Selection for ES is based in part on the ability of the proposers to reduce the data and return feedback within a reasonable time.

By submitting an ES program the proposers agree to the following:

  • There is no guarantee that the program will be observed.
  • The proprietary period for ES data is two months.
  • The PI will provide reduced data to Gemini for public release within two months of the completion ES program.

The GPI astronomers will assist PIs of the successfully accepted programs to complete the Phase II.

TIMELINE

February 5th Call for ES proposals
February 28th Phase I deadline
March 18th Announcement of selected programs
April 7th Phase II deadline
April 20th Start of Early Science run

Please, feel free to contact us with questions.

Sincerely,

The GPI team

Contacts: Fredrik T Rantakyro (frantaky@gemini.edu) and Pascale Hibon (phibon@gemini.edu).

Campaign Science

The first call to submit Campaign science proposals is available here, with a deadline of March 31, 2011. 

The first call for letters of intent to submit Campaign science proposals was closed January 20, 2011. The call can be found here

Early Science

The call for Early Science for GPI starts on February 5th, 2014. In this call the Gemini community is invited to propose Early science (ES) programs for GPI. The deadline for proposal submissions is February 28th, 2014. Approximately 6 nights of ES time is available in the 2014A semester. It is expected that the ES run will take place middle of April 2014 for 6 nights.

If you use any of these data in a publication, please include the standard Gemini acknowledgment:
Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina). 

Early Science Target List

Early Science targets are listed below. Target duplication policies are described here.

ZCMa 07:03:43.164 -11:33:06.221 Y, J, H Coron-Pol
VHya 10:51:37.257 -21:15:00.324 H Coron, Y Coron-Pol
TWHya 11:01:51.907 -34:42:17.032 J Coron, K2 Coron-Pol
IRAS11385-5517 11:40:58.806 -55:34:25.817 J Coron
BYCru 12:04:48.785 -62:00:08.582 K2 Coron-Pol
WCru 12:11:59.163 -58:47:00.743 K2 Coron-Pol
HD107649 12:22:24.855 -51:01:34.349 H Coron
HR4796A 12:36:01.034 -39:52:10.211 J Coron, J, K1 Coron-Pol
HD110506 12:43:09.179 -56:10:34.411 H Coron
HD115600 13:19:19.540 -59:28:20.437 H Coron
HD118379 13:37:17.780 -40:53:52.352 H Coron
HD121191 13:55:18.859 -53:31:43.028 H Coron, H Coron-Pol
HD131488 14:55:08.026 -41:07:13.421 H Coron, H Coron-Pol
HD134331 15:10:41.610 -43:43:47.533 H Coron
HD135344B 15:15:48.439 -37:09:16.026 J direct, J Coron, Y Coron-Pol
Titan 15:25:19.300 -16:15:34.100 H, K1 Direct
HD142527 15:56:41.890 -42:19:23.275 Y,H Direct-Pol, H Coron-Pol
HD146606 16:18:16.160 -28:02:30.154 H Coron
MWC863 16:40:17.923 -23:53:45.179 J Coron-Pol
HD161743 17:48:57.926 -38:07:07.478 Y Direct-Pol
MWC275 17:56:21.288 -21:57:21.870 J Coron-Pol
V4046Sgr 18:14:10.466 -32:47:34.496 J Coron, K2 Coron-Pol
HD169142 18:24:29.779 -29:46:49.371 J Direct, J Coron, J Coron-Pol

GPI Campaign Target List

The GPI Campaign conducted a comprehensive survey to yield a robust census of extrasolar giant planets, and the Campaign concluded in semester 2018B. The campaign targets are listed below for historical reference.  

Target duplication policies are described here.

HIP 159 00:02:02.6 -02:45:58.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 105 00:05:52.5 -41:45:11.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HR 9 00:06:50.1 -23:06:27.1 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 377 00:08:26 06:37:00 H-coron-pol; H-coron-pol
HIP 795 00:09:51.6 08:27:11.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 987 00:13:52.8 -74:41:17.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 984 00:14:10.2 -07:11:56.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 1237 00:16:12.7 -79:51:04.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 1427 00:17:50.0 16:19:51.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 1466 00:18:26.1 -63:28:39.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 1803 00:22:51.8 -12:12:34.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 2072 00:26:12.1 -43:40:47.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 2472 00:31:25.0 -48:48:12.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
* bet01 Tuc 00:31:32.6 -62:57:29.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 2729 00:34:51.2 -61:54:58.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 2841 00:36:00.8 -59:43:01.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 3203 00:40:47.5 -07:13:56.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 3210 00:40:51.6 -53:12:35.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 3277 00:41:46.3 -56:30:05.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 3540 00:45:11.0 00:15:11.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 4944 00:50:24.3 -64:04:04.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 4290 00:54:59.3 24:06:01.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 5373 01:08:45.7 -25:51:40.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 7112 01:09:56.6 -64:21:33.1 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
TYC 6427-0300-1 01:12:40.5 -29:10:46.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 5743 01:13:45.3 07:34:41.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 8077 01:19:05.6 -53:51:01.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 6276 01:20:32.3 -11:28:03.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 6485 01:23:21.1 -57:28:50.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 6494 01:23:25.6 -76:36:42.1 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 6856 01:28:08.7 -52:38:19.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 6960 01:29:36.1 -21:37:45.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 7345 01:34:37.7 -15:40:34.9 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 7576 01:37:35.4 -06:45:36.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 10800 01:37:55.6 -82:58:30.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 10472 01:40:24.1 -60:59:56.6 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 10647 01:42:29.3 -53:44:27.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
tau Cet 01:44:04 -15:56:14 H-coron-pol
HIP 8241 01:46:06.3 -53:31:19.3 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 8661 01:51:36.3 -02:38:16.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 12039 01:57:48.9 -21:54:05.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 9892 02:07:18.0 -53:11:56.4 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 13246 02:07:26.0 -59:40:45.8 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 14228 02:16:30.6 -51:30:44.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 10786 02:18:53.2 -69:53:12.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
LP 353-51 02:23:26.6 22:44:06.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 15279 02:25:52.0 -52:57:52.1 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 15115 02:26:16.2 06:17:33.6 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 11964 02:34:22.6 -43:47:47.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 16699A 02:38:44.2 -52:57:03.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
TYC 8484-1507-1 02:38:45.0 -52:57:08.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 16743 02:39:07.6 -52:56:05.3 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 12394 02:39:35.2 -68:16:00.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 12413 02:39:47.9 -42:53:29.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 12444 02:40:12.4 -09:27:10.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
zet Hor 02:40:39.6 -54:33:00.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
* 84 Cet B 02:41:13.7 -00:41:41.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
BD+05 378 02:41:25.8 05:59:18.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 17051 02:42:33.5 -50:48:01.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 12787 02:44:21.3 10:57:41.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 12837 02:45:01.1 -22:09:58.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 17390 02:46:45.1 -21:38:22.2 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 13027B 02:47:27.2 19:22:21.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 17848 02:49:01.4 -62:48:23.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 13359 02:51:53.0 -61:37:05.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HR 857 02:52:32.1 -12:46:10.9 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 13847 02:58:15.7 -40:18:17.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 14007 03:00:19.7 -37:27:16.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 14551 03:07:50.8 -27:49:52.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
LTT 1479 03:07:55.7 -28:13:10.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
V* AE For 03:08:06.6 -24:45:34.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
IS Eri 03:09:42.3 -09:34:46.5 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 14857 03:11:52.5 -39:01:23.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 15039 03:13:50.2 -38:48:33.4 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 15353 03:17:59.1 -66:55:36.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 20631 03:18:41.1 -18:33:34.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 15457 03:19:21.7 03:22:12.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 21997 03:31:53.6 -25:36:50.9 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
eps Eri 03:32:55.8 -09:27:29.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 16846 03:36:47.3 00:35:15.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 17157 03:40:29.4 -47:55:31.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 17338 03:42:39.8 -20:32:43.8 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 17395 03:43:33.8 -10:29:08.2 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 17695 03:47:23.3 -01:58:19.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 17764 03:48:11.3 -74:41:39.1 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 24071 03:48:35.4 -37:37:19.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HR 1190 03:48:35.8 -37:37:12.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 24224 03:48:47.3 -53:10:56.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 18512 03:57:28.7 -01:09:34.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 18714 04:00:31.9 -41:44:54.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 25457 04:02:36.7 -00:16:08.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 25570 04:03:56.6 08:11:50.1 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 22295 04:04:48:05.0 -80:46:45.5 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 19076 04:05:20.3 22:00:32.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 19183 04:06:41.5 01:41:02.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 26980 04:14:22.5 -38:19:01.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 19855 04:15:25.8 06:11:58.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 26923 04:15:28.8 06:11:12.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
gam Dor 04:16:01.6 -51:29:11.9 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 19990 04:17:15.7 20:34:43.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 20737 04:26:38.6 -28:57:06.5 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
51 Eri 04:37:36.1 -02:28:24.8 H-coron (~4 hr); Y-coron (~4 hr);
J-coron (~4 hr); K1-coron (~4 hr);
K2-coron (~6 hr); J-POL (~4 hr)
HIP 21632 04:38:43.9 -27:02:01.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 29697 04:41:18.8 20:54:05.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 21965 04:43:17.2 -23:37:41.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 22192 04:46:25.7 -28:05:15.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 30447 04:46:49.5 -26:18:09.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
IX Eri 04:47:36.3 -16:56:04.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 22506 04:50:35.4 -41:02:51.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
LP 776-25 04:52:24.4 -16:49:21.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 22738 04:53:31.2 -55:51:37.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 31392 04:54:04.2 -35:24:16.2 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 22844 04:54:53.0 -58:32:51.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 22845 04:54:53.7 10:09:04.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
CD-57 1054 05:00:47.1 -57:15:25.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 32372 05:00:51.8 -41:01:06.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 32309 05:01:25.6 -20:03:06.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 32297 05:02:27.4 07:27:39.9 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 23554 05:03:53.3 -24:23:17.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
zet Dor 05:05:30.7 -57:28:22.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
BD-21 1074 05:06:49.9 -21:35:09.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 24362 05:13:37.3 -32:04:01.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 24947 05:20:38.0 -39:45:18.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 25127 05:22:42.7 13:13:45.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
* 111 Tau 05:24:25.4 17:23:00.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 25283 05:24:30.1 -38:58:10.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
CD-43 1846 05:26:22.9 -43:22:36.4 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 35996 05:26:24.0 -43:22:32.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 35841 05:26:36.6 -22:29:23.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
AF Lep 05:27:04.8 -11:54:03.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 25544 05:27:39.4 -60:24:57.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 25627 05:28:28.0 -39:22:15.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 25709 05:29:24.1 -34:30:56.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 25746 05:29:50.1 -47:04:34.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
TYC 5916-0792-1 05:34:09.2 -15:17:03.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
2MASS J05365509-4757481 05:36:55.0 -47:57:47.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 26395 05:37:08.8 -11:46:31.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
TYC 7604-1675-1 05:37:13.2 -42:42:57.3 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 26412 05:37:16.5 -27:52:16.3 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 37484 05:37:39.6 -28:37:34.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 37478 05:39:17.1 10:15:35.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 26990 05:43:35.8 -39:55:25.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 27134 05:45:13.4 -59:55:26.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 27288 05:46:57.3 -14:49:19.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
beta Pic 05:47:17.1 -51:04:00.2 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 27371 05:47:49.5 -40:03:50.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 27441 05:48:36.8 -39:55:55.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 40781 05:59:13.3 -38:42:38.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 28498 06:00:55.3 -54:57:05.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 28869 06:05:42.1 -61:44:55.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 28921 06:06:16.6 -27:54:21.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
CD-35 2722 06:09:19.2 -35:49:31.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
V352 CMa 06:13:45.3 -23:51:43.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 29711 06:15:29.7 -04:54:52.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 43976 06:15:38.8 -57:42:05.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
V* AO Men 06:18:28.2 -72:02:41.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
V1358 Ori 06:19:08.0 -03:26:20.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 30034 06:19:12.9 -58:03:15.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 30252 06:21:50.0 -51:14:15.8 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 44748 06:21:57.2 -34:30:43.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 45270 06:22:31.0 -60:13:07.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 30344 06:22:57.7 -24:33:21.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 30729 06:27:20.7 -33:06:49.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 31167 06:32:23.1 -05:52:07.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 31850 06:39:31.5 24:35:59.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 31878 06:39:50.1 -61:28:42.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
TYC 4803-1418-1 06:40:22.4 -03:31:59.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 32075 06:42:05.5 -38:00:13.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
* 26 Gem 06:42:24.3 17:38:43.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
TYC 4803-0625-1 06:43:01.0 -02:53:19.3 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 32235 06:43:46.3 -71:58:35.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 32349 06:45:08.9 -16:42:58.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 50571 06:50:01.0 -60:14:57.9 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 32938 06:51:42.5 -36:13:48.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 50554 06:54:42.8 24:14:44.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 51797 06:56:23.5 -46:46:55.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 53143 06:59:59.7 -61:20:10.2 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 33705 07:00:09.8 -31:08:30.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 55279 07:00:30.4 -79:41:45.9 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 34271 07:06:16.8 22:41:00.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 34782 07:12:04.1 -30:49:17.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 35350 07:18:05.6 16:32:25.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 35564 07:20:21.4 -52:18:41.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
TYC8132-2110-1 07:20:21.9 -52:18:33.3 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 35567 07:20:23.0 -56:17:41.3 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
TYC 7116-2739-1 07:22:16.3 -35:55:06.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 35884 07:23:53.8 -17:24:48.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 36071 07:25:57.2 -02:14:54.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 59704 07:29:31.4 -38:07:21.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 59967 07:30:42.6 -37:20:22.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 36832 07:34:28.0 -52:58:05.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 61005 07:35:47.5 -32:12:14.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
TYC 1365-1688-1 07:36:01.1 18:08:29.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 37288 07:39:23.0 02:11:01.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 62237 07:42:26.5 -16:17:00.3 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 37563 07:42:36.1 -59:17:51.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 37718 07:44:12.5 -50:27:24.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 37727 07:44:16.5 -50:27:59.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
GJ 285 07:44:40.2 03:33:08.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 37879 07:45:50.9 -07:31:46.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 63608 07:46:17.0 -59:48:34.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HR 3070 07:49:12.9 -60:17:01.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 38188 07:49:29.3 -54:54:04.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
BD +07 1919A 08:07:09.1 07:23:00.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
TYC 0195-2572-1 08:11:15.1 01:16:36.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 40706 08:18:33.3 -36:39:33.4 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 40916 08:21:00.5 -52:13:40.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 70573 08:22:50.0 01:51:34.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 41081 08:22:55.2 -52:07:25.6 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
V* V592 Pup 08:25:17.7 -34:22:01.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 41373 08:26:25.2 -52:48:27.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 41889 08:32:30.5 15:49:26.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 72687 08:33:15.4 -29:57:23.8 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 42172 08:35:51.0 06:37:12.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
V401 Hya 08:37:50.5 -06:48:25.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
* eta Cha 08:41:19.5 -78:57:48.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 42806 08:43:17.2 21:28:06.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 42808 08:43:18.0 -38:52:57.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 43290 08:49:05.7 -39:57:16.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 43771 08:54:57.2 -24:23:39.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 43970 08:57:14.9 15:19:21.9 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 44001 08:57:35.2 15:34:52.6 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
TYC 6589-789-1 08:59:18.3 -24:43:43.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 44526 09:04:20.8 -15:54:51.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 45238 09:13:12.0 -69:43:01.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 45950 09:22:17.7 06:17:51.3 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 46422 09:27:57.5 -66:06:07.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 46634 09:30:35.0 10:36:00.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 46816 09:32:25.6 -11:11:04.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 82943 09:34:50.7 -12:07:46.3 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
TYC 6601-1855-1 09:35:12.2 -23:50:39.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
TYC 4900-1772-1 09:35:12.2 -05:50:56.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 84075 09:36:18.0 -78:20:42.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 83946 09:38:54.1 -64:59:26.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
TYC 6606-1001-1 09:41:41.9 -25:57:51.8 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
CPD-55 2452B 09:42:40.6 -55:49:53.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 47625A 09:42:40.8 -55:49:55.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 47681 09:43:20.3 -29:48:14.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
BD+17 2140 09:49:40.6 16:22:13.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 48273 09:50:30.1 04:20:37.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 48341 09:51:14.0 -04:14:35.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 49165 10:02:00.5 -34:10:25.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
V* AN Sex 10:12:17.6 -03:44:44.3 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 298936 10:13:14.7 -52:30:53.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 88742 10:13:24.7 -33:01:54.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 50191 10:14:44.2 -42:07:18.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 50534 10:19:16.3 -11:22:42.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
TYC 0251-1015-1 10:19:28.6 06:34:59.1 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 50693 10:21:07.9 -17:59:05.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 90712 10:27:47.8 -34:23:58.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 51266B 10:28:17.9 -52:33:40.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 51266A 10:28:18.5 -52:33:42.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
BD+01 2447 10:28:55.5 00:50:27.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 90905 10:29:42.2 01:29:28.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 51907 10:36:17.4 -10:34:60.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
V* CE Ant 10:42:30.1 -33:40:16.2 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
V419 Hya 10:43:28.3 -29:03:51.1 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 52787 10:47:31.2 -22:20:52.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 53217 10:53:04.5 -20:37:41.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP53524 10:57:03.1 -68:40:02.6 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 53771 11:00:08.3 -51:49:04.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
V* TW Hya 11:01:51.9 -34:42:17.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 53954 11:02:19.8 20:10:47.1 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 54155 11:04:41.5 -04:13:15.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 54477 11:08:44.0 -28:04:50.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
GJ 1144 11:16:22.1 -14:41:36.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 55130 11:17:12.1 -38:00:51.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 55487 11:21:49.8 -24:11:23.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 99827 11:25:17.7 -84:57:16.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 55943 11:27:55.4 11:00:36.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 56367 11:33:16.7 -03:24:08.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP56379 11:33:25.5 -70:11:41.2 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 56445 11:34:22.0 03:03:36.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 57013 11:41:19.9 -43:05:44.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 57207 11:43:49.8 -35:14:52.8 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 57460 11:46:42.3 -19:28:11.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 102458 11:47:24.5 -49:53:03.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 57562 11:47:54.9 08:14:45.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 57632 11:49:03.6 14:34:19.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 103234 11:53:08.0 -56:43:38.1 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP58167 11:55:43.6 -54:10:50.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 58180 11:55:57.1 -77:00:30.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 58240 11:56:42.3 -32:16:05.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 58241 11:56:43.8 -32:16:02.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP58465 11:59:23.8 -57:10:04.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP58528 12:00:09.4 -57:07:01.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 104467 12:01:39.1 -78:59:16.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP58720 12:02:37.8 -69:11:32.2 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP59282 12:09:38.8 -58:20:58.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 59315 12:10:06.5 -49:10:50.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 59394 12:11:03.9 -23:36:08.5 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP59397 12:11:05.9 -56:24:04.8 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP59413 12:11:14.8 -52:13:03.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP59481 12:11:58.9 -50:46:12.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 106444 12:14:50.7 -55:47:23.5 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
2MASS J12145229-5547037 12:14:52.2 -55:47:03.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP59724 12:14:56.4 -47:56:54.5 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 59726 12:14:57.4 -41:08:22.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
TWA 25 12:15:31 -39:48:42 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP59898 12:17:06.4 -65:41:34.6 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP59960 12:17:53.2 -55:58:31.8 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 107146 12:19:06.5 16:32:53.9 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP60183 12:20:28.3 -65:50:33.5 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 107722 12:23:29.0 -77:40:51.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP60459 12:23:42.2 -63:52:12.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 60595 12:25:11.8 -11:36:37.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 108611 12:29:02.2 -64:55:00.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP61049 12:30:46.3 -58:11:16.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP61087 12:31:12.7 -61:54:31.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
eta CrV 12:32:04.2 -16:11:45.6 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 61468 12:35:45.6 -41:01:18.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HR 4796 12:36:01.1 -39:52:10.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP61684 12:38:42.8 -68:45:49.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 109908 12:38:49.0 -51:12:56.1 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
2MASS J12392124-7502391 12:39:21.2 -75:02:39.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP61782 12:39:46.2 -49:11:55.4 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 61960 12:41:53.1 10:14:08.3 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP62134 12:44:02.0 -53:30:20.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 62403 12:47:19.0 -66:14:14.8 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 62482 12:48:17 -67:07:52 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP62657 12:50:19.8 -49:51:48.8 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP63236 12:57:26.3 -67:57:38.4 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
CD-69 1055 12:58:25.5 -70:28:49.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 63439 12:59:59 -50:23:22 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 63734 13:03:39.0 -16:20:11.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP63836 13:04:59.5 -47:23:48.4 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 63862 13:05:16.8 -50:51:24.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 63905 13:05:46.3 -18:49:33.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 113853 13:06:59.1 -37:44:40.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP64184 13:09:16.2 -60:18:29.9 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 114613 13:12:03.2 -37:48:11.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 115383 13:16:46.5 09:25:27.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 64822 13:17:13.9 -43:58:46.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
61 Vir 13:18:24.3 -18:18:40.3 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP64995 13:19:19.6 -59:28:20.3 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP65089 13:20:26.8 -49:13:25.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 65109 13:20:35.8 -36:42:44.3 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 65198 13:21:41.6 02:05:14.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 65208 13:21:49.8 -36:06:44.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP65875 13:30:09.0 -58:29:04.2 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP65965 13:31:31.0 -46:44:06.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 66065 13:32:36.0 -28:41:33.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 66121 13:33:13.7 -77:34:09.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 66200 13:34:07.9 03:39:32.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP66454 13:37:23.5 -46:25:40.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP66722 13:40:37.7 -44:19:48.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP66821 13:41:44.8 -54:33:33.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
TYC 8262-2044-1 13:43:22.0 -46:38:08.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP67199 13:46:14.5 -54:40:59.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP67497 13:49:54.5 -50:14:23.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP67957 13:55:01.3 -50:45:01.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
G 150-52 13:57:16.1 23:21:44.3 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
TYC 1470-0009-1 13:58:13.6 19:17:11.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP68335 13:59:18.1 -51:53:34.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP68781 14:04:42.2 -50:04:16.9 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 122973 14:05:10.6 -09:02:54.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 68994 14:07:29.3 -61:33:43.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 69592 14:14:40.9 21:52:24.3 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 69751 14:16:32.8 20:07:18.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 69781 14:16:57.9 -49:56:42.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 125283 14:19:23.9 -37:00:10.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 125485 14:23:39.1 -72:48:29.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 126246 B 14:24:05.4 11:14:57.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
TYC 0912-1575-1 14:24:05.5 11:14:57.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP70441 14:24:37.0 -47:10:39.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP70558 14:25:58.5 -44:49:23.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP70689 14:27:30.5 -52:31:30.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP70697 14:27:33.6 -46:12:48.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP70833 14:29:07.2 -43:21:42.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP71271 14:34:33.5 -46:18:17.1 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP71321 14:35:05.4 -43:33:16.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 71743 14:40:31.1 -16:12:33.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 71855 14:41:52.5 -75:08:22.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 71899 14:42:23.1 21:17:35.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 129181 14:42:43.5 -48:47:58.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 72070 14:44:31 -39:59:21 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 72048 14:44:14.1 -69:40:26.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 129679 14:44:16.8 -11:37:02.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 72197B 14:46:00.6 -25:26:39.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP72627 14:50:58.7 -42:49:20.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 131435 14:54:54.8 -41:21:53.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 130943 14:55:46.1 -73:09:59.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP73145 14:56:54.5 -35:41:43.4 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP73266 14:58:24.3 -37:21:44.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 132173 14:58:30.5 -28:42:34.3 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 133295 15:04:33.1 -28:18:00.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP73990 15:07:15.0 -29:30:15.9 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
BD+09 3000A 15:07:32.9 09:13:33.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 74049 15:07:57.8 -45:34:45.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 74380 15:11:57.7 -48:44:37.3 H-coron (~1 hr)
V* NY Aps 15:12:23.4 -75:15:15.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 74493 15:13:19.2 -19:38:51.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP74499 15:13:28.0 -33:08:50.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 135271 15:15:13.9 -30:58:40.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 74689 15:15:49.1 00:22:19.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 74696 15:15:53.7 -48:04:25.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 74824 15:17:30.9 -58:48:04.3 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP74865 15:17:56.1 -30:28:41.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 74931 15:18:42.2 10:25:26.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 74946 15:18:54.7 -68:40:46.1 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP74959 15:19:05.4 -36:21:44.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP75077 15:20:31.4 -28:17:13.3 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP75210 15:22:11.3 -37:38:08.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 75379 15:24:11.9 -10:19:20.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP75480 15:25:09.4 -26:34:30.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP75915 15:30:21.3 -41:55:08.3 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 76028 15:31:42.6 -20:09:51.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 76063 15:32:04.2 -38:37:21.2 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP76084 15:32:20.2 -31:08:33.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
CD-51 9202 15:32:36.7 -52:21:20.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 76276 15:34:48.1 10:32:19.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 76310 15:35:16 -25:44:03 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
V343 Nor 15:38:57.5 -57:42:27.3 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP76633 15:39:00.1 -19:43:57.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
g Lup 15:41:11.4 -44:39:40.3 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP76875 15:41:53.2 -34:53:19.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 77310 15:47:00.2 -62:47:47.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP77317 15:47:06.2 -35:31:04.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP77432 15:48:24.8 -42:37:04.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 77464 15:48:56.8 -03:49:06.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP77520 15:49:39.7 -38:46:38.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 77541 15:49:57.5 -48:54:44.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 141569 15:49:57.8 -03:55:16.2 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP77545 15:49:59.8 -25:09:03.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 77622 15:50:49.0 04:28:39.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
NZ Lup 15:53:27.3 -42:16:00.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP77911 15:54:41.6 -22:45:58.3 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP78043 15:56:05.6 -36:53:34.1 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 78045 15:56:06.0 -60:28:56.3 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP78099 15:56:47.9 -23:11:02.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 142415 15:57:40.8 -60:12:01.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP78196 15:57:59.4 -31:43:43.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP78207 15:58:11.4 -14:16:45.5 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 78343 15:59:47.7 -35:50:43.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 78553 16:02:16.1 -73:30:54.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP78555 16:02:18.5 -35:16:11.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP78641 16:03:13.6 -35:17:14.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP78663 16:03:33.4 -30:08:13.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
TYC 0945-0806-1 16:06:10.3 08:35:44.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP78996 16:07:29.9 -23:57:02.2 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 145229 16:09:26.6 11:34:28.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 79203 16:09:55.3 -18:20:26.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP79288 16:10:55.1 -25:31:21.4 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP79410 16:12:21.8 -19:34:44.4 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP79516 16:13:34.4 -45:49:03.4 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP79599 16:14:28.9 -21:06:27.2 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 79730 16:16:19.6 -01:38:53.3 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP79742 16:16:28.4 -38:44:12.1 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 79797 16:17:05.5 -67:56:28.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 79881 16:18:17.9 -28:36:50.5 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 146610 16:18:38.5 -38:39:11.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 79958 16:19:15.9 -55:30:17.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP79977 16:19:29.3 -21:24:13.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 80065 16:20:32.5 -45:48:35.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP80088 16:20:50.2 -22:35:38.6 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 80170 16:21:55.2 19:09:10.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP80324 16:23:56.7 -33:11:57.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 147513 16:24:01.3 -39:11:35.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
TYC 0959-0989-1 16:26:48.9 08:23:26.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP80591 16:27:14.6 -39:49:21.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
TYC 5626-0979-1 16:27:29.0 -08:34:19.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 80686 16:28:28.1 -70:05:03.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 81068 16:33:30.1 17:49:43.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 81425 16:37:48.0 13:41:13.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 81592 16:39:47.0 -51:59:39.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 150554 16:40:56.5 21:56:53.3 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 82303 16:48:59.8 -08:55:47.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 151798 16:50:05.2 -12:23:14.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP82397 16:50:10.7 -26:44:32.9 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP82534 16:52:13.3 -26:55:10.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 152555 16:54:08.1 -04:20:24.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 82747 16:54:45 -36:53:19 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 83187 17:00:06.2 -54:35:49.2 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
BD+07 3306B 17:06:56.7 06:47:48.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 154734 17:06:57.5 06:48:02.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 83962 17:09:48.0 -10:31:23.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 84121 17:11:51.2 -45:52:27.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 84150 17:12:16.2 -39:30:24.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 84229B 17:12:58.9 -58:35:47.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 84397 17:15:17.3 -07:12:06.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 84586 17:17:25.5 -66:57:03.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 84881 17:20:51 -45:25:15 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 85038 17:22:47.9 -58:28:23.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 85157 17:24:06.6 22:57:37.4 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 157587 17:24:52.2 -18:51:33.2 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
TYC 7883-2069-1 17:25:34.3 -38:48:39.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 85307 17:25:57.8 -01:39:06.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 85360 17:26:34.9 -32:58:11.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
CD-54 7336 17:29:55.0 -54:15:48.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 85922 17:33:29.9 -05:44:40.5 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 86305 17:38:05.5 -54:30:01.6 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 160305 17:41:49.0 -50:43:28.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 86672 17:42:30.4 -28:44:56.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
TYC 0424-1952-1 17:46:25.4 03:58:48.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 161012 17:46:48.5 -59:06:14.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 87108 17:47:53.6 02:42:26.9 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 87914A 17:57:31.7 -57:39:51.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 164249 18:03:03.4 -51:38:55.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 88694 18:06:23.7 -36:01:11.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 89805 18:19:40.1 -63:53:11.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 90133 18:23:36.4 -75:02:39.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
TYC 7401-2446-1 18:24:50.6 -34:11:26.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
L 206-187 18:30:11.9 -58:16:27.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 170773 18:33:00.9 -39:53:31.3 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 90991 18:33:39.0 -14:51:12.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 91043 18:34:20.2 18:41:24.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 91217 18:36:27.8 09:07:21.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 92024 18:45:26.9 -64:52:16.5 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 92161 18:47:01.3 18:10:53.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
PZ Tel 18:53:05.9 -50:10:50.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 92871 18:55:27.4 08:24:09.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 175726 18:56:37.2 04:15:55.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 93375 19:01:06.0 -28:42:49.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 176383 19:01:28.6 -34:22:35.5 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
TYC 466-1374-1 19:02:17.1 02:44:22.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
rho Tel 19:06:19.9 -52:20:26.3 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 94020 19:08:31.7 -30:58:21.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 94050 19:08:50.5 -42:25:41.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 94114 19:09:28.3 -37:54:16.1 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 95261 19:22:51.2 -54:25:26.2 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 181327 19:22:58.9 -54:32:17.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 181869 19:23:53.2 -40:36:57.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 182681 19:26:56.5 -29:44:35.2 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 95793 19:29:01.0 01:57:01.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 183216 19:29:40.6 -30:47:51.9 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
TYC 7429-1696-1 19:30:57.4 -32:41:56.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 96334 19:35:09.7 -69:58:32.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 185181 19:38:51.5 -25:52:19.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 96880 19:41:35.7 -72:26:45.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 97229 19:45:39.9 07:36:47.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 97423 19:48:03.0 -13:42:12.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 97557 19:49:44.0 -32:45:49.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 97944 19:54:17.8 -23:56:27.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 98470 20:00:20.3 -33:42:12.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 188228 20:00:35.6 -72:54:37.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
CD-50 12781 20:02:36.2 -50:03:00.3 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 98839 20:04:18.1 -26:19:46.3 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 190081 20:04:36.5 -35:12:51.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
TYC 9098-1297-1 20:07:19.8 -65:51:08.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 191089 20:09:05.2 -26:13:26.5 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 99742 20:14:16.6 15:11:50.9 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 99803 20:14:56.1 -56:58:34.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
CPD-57 9635B 20:14:56.4 -56:58:28.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 193924 20:25:38.9 -56:44:05.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 100787 20:26:04.7 -46:39:35.8 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 101022 20:28:49.9 -01:44:04.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 101120 20:29:52.6 -18:35:10.3 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 101123 20:29:53.9 -18:34:59.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 101483 20:33:57.0 13:01:37.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 195830 20:34:46.9 -33:55:19.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 195627 20:35:34.9 -60:34:54.3 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 101800 20:37:49.1 11:22:39.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
AU Mic 20:45:09.5 -31:20:27.2 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 102531 20:46:38.9 16:07:26.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
V* BO Mic 20:47:45.0 -36:35:40.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
CD-28 16938 20:49:47.9 -28:28:09.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 103107 20:53:25.9 -49:22:58.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 199260 20:56:47.3 -26:17:46.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 199065A 20:57:22.4 -59:04:33.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 103460 20:57:40.6 -16:01:53.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 104239 21:07:10.4 -13:55:23.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 104308 21:07:51.2 -54:12:58.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 104365 21:08:33.6 -21:11:36.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 104526A 21:10:25.4 -54:34:26.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
TYC 8797-1377-2 21:10:25.7 -54:34:28.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 104687B 21:12:22.4 -14:59:58.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 104687A 21:12:22.6 -15:00:00.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 104864 21:14:32.8 -22:52:41.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 105044 21:16:37.9 -36:10:24.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 105156 21:18:05.2 -29:30:48.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 105184 21:18:27.3 -43:20:05.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 202917 21:20:49.9 -53:02:02.4 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 105404 21:20:59.8 -52:28:40.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 105441 21:21:24.5 -66:54:57.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 105612 21:23:27.1 -75:29:38.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 105712 21:24:40.6 -68:13:40.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 105860 21:26:26.6 19:22:32.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 205674 21:37:21.1 -18:26:28.2 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 205905 21:39:10.2 -27:18:24.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 107095 21:41:32.9 -14:02:51.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HN Peg 21:44:31.3 14:46:19.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 206893 21:45:21.9 -12:47:00.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 207129 21:48:15.8 -47:18:13.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 107947 21:52:09.7 -62:03:08.5 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 108060 21:53:37.4 19:40:06.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 108405 21:57:41.2 -51:00:22.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 209253 22:02:33.0 -32:08:01.5 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 209100 22:03:21.7 -56:47:10.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 108912 22:03:42.4 -60:26:15.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 209952 22:08:14.0 -46:57:39.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 109285 22:08:23.0 -32:59:18.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
V* CS Gru 22:15:35.2 -39:00:50.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
BD-14 6241 22:16:00.6 -14:11:02.3 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 110935 22:28:37.7 -67:29:20.6 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 111188 22:31:30.3 -32:20:45.7 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
39 Peg 22:32:35.5 20:13:48.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 111594 22:36:29.3 -40:34:57.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 214867 22:41:45.4 -39:27:41.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
CPD-72 2713 22:42:48.9 -71:42:21.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
TYC 1701-0642-1 22:44:41.5 17:54:18.3 H-coron (~1 hr)
V* WW PsA 22:44:57.9 -33:15:01.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 112515 22:47:26.7 -44:57:55.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 112581 22:48:06.9 -37:45:24.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 112714 22:49:32.2 10:28:43.3 H-coron (~1 hr)
TW PsA 22:56:24.1 -31:33:56.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
Fomalhaut 22:57:39.0 -29:37:20.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HD 217343 23:00:19.3 -26:09:13.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
MT Peg 23:03:05.0 20:55:06.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 113839 23:03:11.6 -47:15:19.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HR 8799 23:07:28.7 21:08:03.3 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 114530 23:11:52.1 -45:08:10.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 114948 23:16:57.7 -62:00:04.3 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 115527 23:24:06.3 -07:33:03.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 115738 23:26:56.0 01:15:20.2 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
CD-86 147 23:27:49.4 -86:13:18.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
GJ 1284 23:30:13.4 -20:23:27.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 116063 23:31:02.9 -69:04:36.3 H-coron (~1 hr)
TYC 5835-0239-1 23:32:22.7 -13:39:07.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
BD-13 6424 23:32:30.8 -12:15:51.4 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 116258 23:33:23.8 -12:39:53.0 H-coron (~1 hr)
HD 221853 23:35:36.2 08:22:57.4 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 116611 23:37:56.8 18:24:02.2 H-coron (~1 hr)
2MASS J23393929-6911396 23:39:39.2 -69:11:39.5 H-coron (~1 hr)
TYC 9339-551-1 23:39:39.4 -69:11:44.8 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 116928 23:42:02.8 01:46:48.1 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 116971 23:42:43.3 -14:32:41.7 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 117219 23:46:01.2 -40:10:56.9 H-coron (~1 hr)
HIP 117452 23:48:55.6 -28:07:49.0 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 117481 23:49:19.6 -27:51:14.9 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 118008 23:56:10.7 -39:03:08.4 H-coron (~1 hr); H-coron-pol
HIP 118121 23:57:35.0 -64:17:53.1 H-coron (~1 hr)

GPI News Email Exploder

If you wish to receive news from GPI and any updates from the GPI webpages, you can subscribe to the email exploder : gpinews@gemini.edu.

To subscribe to the list, click on Subscribe. This will send a message to listserver@gemini.edu with a subject of "subscribe gpinews" (without the quotation marks).

To leave this list at any time, click on Unsubscribe. This will send email to with a subject of "unsubscribe gpinews" (without the quotation marks).

GPI Public Data

Several GPI raw and reduced datasets are available as part of a First Data Release. 

Information about these datasets are presented in the Table below, with links to download the datasets.

Anyone downloading any of the datasets should read the GPI Public Data Early Release Readme as it contains vital information.

If you use any of these data in a publication, please include the standard Gemini acknowledgment:

Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

 Target Name   Raw Package   Reduced Package   Information 
 HD 10647  HD10647_J_131117_rawtar   HD10647_J_131117_reducedtar   J-band 
Pipeline file
 HD 1160  HD1160_Y_131117_rawtar  HD1160_Y_131117_reducedtar   Y-band
Pipeline file
 HD 20619  HD20619_Y_131117_rawtar 
HD20619_J_131117_rawtar 
HD20619_H_131117_rawtar
HD20619_K1_131117_rawtar
HD20619_K2_131117_rawtar
 HD20619_Y_131117_reduced.tar.gz
HD20619_J_131117_reduced.tar.gz
HD20619_H_131117_reduced.tar.gz
HD20619_K1_131117_reduced.tar.gz
HD20619_K2_131117_reduced.tar.gz 
 Y direct : Pipeline drf file
J direct : Pipeline drf file 1
J direct : Pipeline drf file 2
H direct : Pipeline drf file
K1 direct : Pipeline drf file
K2 direct : Pipeline drf file
 HIP 21861

HIP21861_H_131114_raw.tar.gz
HIP21861_H_131117_raw.tar.gz     

 HIP21861_H_131114_reduced.tar.gz
HIP21861_H_131117_reduced.tar.gz  
 Coronograph H-band
Pipeline drf file 131114
Pipeline drf file 131117
 HIP 23079  HIP23079_H_131211_30s_raw.tar.gz
HIP23079_H_131211_60s_raw.tar.gz
 HIP23079_H_131211_30s_reduced.tar.gz
HIP23079_H_131211_60s_reduced.tar.gz  
 Coronograph H-band
Pipeline drf file 30s
Pipeline drf file 60s
 HIP 2472  HIP2472_H_131114_raw.tar.gz  HIP2472_H_131114_reduced.tar.gz  Coronograph H-band
Pipeline drf file 1
Pipeline drf file 2
 HIP 24505  HIP24505_H_131114_raw.tar.gz  HIP24505_H_131114_reduced.tar.gz  Coronograph H-band
Pipeline file
 HIP 26373  HIP26373_H_131114_raw.tar.gz  HIP26373_H_131114_reduced.tar.gz  Coronograph H-band
Pipeline file
 HIP 29582  HIP29852_J_131115_raw.tar.gz  HIP29852_J_131115_reduced.tar.gz   J-band
Pipeline file
 HIP 30979  HIP30979_H_131115_raw.tar.gz  HIP30979_H_131115_reduced.tar.gz  H direct
Pipeline file
 HIP 33590  HIP33590_H_131114_raw.tar.gz  HIP33590_H_131114_reduced.tar.gz  Coronograph H-band
Pipeline file
 HIP 47115  HIP47115_J_131211_raw.tar.gz  HIP47115_J_131211_reduced.tar.gz   J-band
Pipeline file
 HD 51956

HD51956_Y_131113_raw.tar.gz
HD51956_J_131113_raw.tar.gz
HD51956_H_131113_raw.tar.gz
HD51956_K1_131113_raw.tar.gz
HD51956_K2_131113_raw.tar.gz     

 HD51956_Y_131113_reduced.tar.gz
HD51956_J_131113_reduced.tar.gz
HD51956_H_131113_reduced.tar.gz
HD51956_K1_131113_reduced.tar.gz
HD51956_K2_131113_reduced.tar.gz  
  Y-band
Pipeline drf file Y-coron
Y direct
Pipeline drf file Y-direct
Coronograph J-band
Pipeline drf file J-coron
J direct
Pipeline drf file J-direct
Coronograph H-band
Pipeline drf file H-coron
H direct
Pipeline drf file H-direct
Coronograph K1-band
Pipeline drf file K1-coron
K1 direct
Pipeline drf file K1-direct
Coronograph K2-band
Pipeline drf file K2-coron
K2 direct
Pipeline drf file K2-direct
 HD 61005  HD61005_J_131210_raw.tar.gz  HD61005_J_131210_reduced.tar.gz   J-band
Pipeline file
 HD 64332  HD64322_K2_131117_raw.tar.gz  HD64322_K2_131117_reduced.tar.gz 
 
 K2 direct
readme file
 HD 8049

HD8049_J_131116_raw.tar.gz
HD8049_H_131116_raw.tar.gz
HD8049_H_131210_raw.tar.gz
HD8049_K1_131210_raw.tar.gz
HD8049_K2_131210_raw.tar.gz     

 HD8049_J_131116_reduced.tar.gz
HD8049_H_131116_reduced.tar.gz
HD8049_H_131210_reduced.tar.gz
HD8049_K1_131210_reduced.tar.gz
HD8049_K2_131210_reduced.tar.gz

Coronograph J-band
Pipeline file
Coronograph H-band
Pipeline drf file 131116
Pipeline drf file 131210
Coronograph K1-band
Pipeline drf file 1
Pipeline drf file 2
Coronograph K2-band  
Pipeline drf file 1
Pipeline drf file 2

 HD 95086  HD95086_H_131211_raw.tar.gz
HD95086_K1_131210_raw.tar.gz
 HD95086_H_131211_reduced.tar.gz
HD95086_K1_131211_reduced.tar.gz 
 Coronograph H-band
Pipeline file
Coronograph K1-band
Pipeline file
 Beta Pic  betaPic_J_131210_raw.tar.gz   betaPic_J_131210_reduced.tar.gz   J-band
Pipeline file
 Neptune  Neptune_H_131211_raw.tar.gz  Neptune_H_131211_reduced.tar.gz  H direct
Pipeline file
 Tau 01 Eri  tau01Eri_H_131116_raw.tar.gz  tau01Eri_H_131116_reduced.tar.gz  H LIWA
Pipeline file
 Teta 01 EriA   tet01OriA_H_131113_15s_raw.tar.gz
tet01OriA_H_131113_60s_raw.tar.gz
 tet01OriA_H_131113_15s_reduced.tar.gz
tet01OriA_H_131113_60s_reduced.tar.gz 
 Coronograph H-band 
Pipeline drf file 15s
Pipeline drf file 60s
 Teta 01 EriB  tet01OriB_H_131113_raw.tar.gz
tet01OriB_K1_131117_raw.tar.gz
 tet01OriB_H_131113_reduced.tar.gz
tet01OriB_K1_131113_reduced.tar.gz 
 Coronograph H-band 
Pipeline file
Coronograph K1-band 
Pipeline file

Flats and Arcs can be found at  :

Raw   Reduced   Information
 CALIB_Y_raw.tar    CALIB_Y_reduced.tar   Flats and Ar Arcs in Y band
 CALIB_J_raw.tar    CALIB_J_reduced.tar    Flats and Ar Arcs in J band
 CALIB_H_raw.tar    CALIB_H_reduced.tar   Flats and Ar Arcs in H band
 CALIB_K1_raw.tar    CALIB_K1_reduced.tar   Flats and Ar Arcs in K1 band
 CALIB_K2_raw.tar    CALIB_K2_reduced.tar   Flats and Ar, Xe Arcs in K2 band

The dark package is available at : Darks.zip, the wavelength reference calibration package at : Wavecals.zip, the distortion map at: S20120121210S0066-distor-150310.fits.gz, the badPixelmap at: BadPixelMaps.tar.gz and the lenslet flat at: S20131212S0004_lensletflat_spec.fits.gz .  

The current version of the GPI IDL pipeline and data reduction package is now available from the instrument build team. 

Recipes are available here : extract_recipes.py

GPIES Campaign

Gemini Planet Imager Extra Solar Survey 

The GPIES Campaign is the winning proposal in the CfP for Campaign observations with GPI. It was awarded 890h over six semesters starting in 2014B and concluded in semester 2018B. 

GPIES Campaign Executive summary

Program Time usage of the GPIES Campaign

GPIES Observations in the Gemini Observatory Archive (GOA) 

GPIES Campaign Executive summary

The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) was built as a survey instrument to directly detect planets and image debris disks. Our survey will use GPI to produce the first-ever robust census of giant planet populations in the 5-50 AU range, allowing us to

  1. formation pathways of Jovian planets
  2. early dynamical evolution of systems, including migration mechanisms and the interaction with disks and belts of debris
  3. gap between Jupiter and the brown dwarfs with the first examples of cool planetary atmospheres.

The only way to achieve robust and reliable statistical results is with a single coherent survey, with uniform and well-articulated selection criteria. We will observe 600 stars spanning spectral types A-M. We will use published young association catalogs and a proprietary list – the result of thousands of hours of telescope observations in preparation for GPI—that adds several hundred new young (<100 Myr, <75 and adolescent (<300 Myr, <35 stars. The latter, closer than the known young associations, allow our survey to probe the 5 AU ice line. Monte Carlo simulations of populations around these stars allow us to optimize the survey strategy for maximum statistical yield. The range of separations studied by GPI is completely inaccessible to Doppler and transit techniques (even with Kepler—a new window into planet formation.

this survey will discover approximately 50 increasing the number of images by an order of magnitude, enough for statistical investigation. The survey will deliver:

  1. A catalog of —the principal legacy of this campaign—released for follow-up to the Gemini community within 18 months of observation
  2. For a subset of 10 planets, a library of high-SNR GPI spectra at all 5 bands to calibrate temperature and gravity indicators
  3. For each planet, estimated effective temperatures and luminosities from GPI spectrophotometry, and semi-major axis estimates from orbital motion
  4. Empirical measurements of the number of young planets as a function of mass, semi-major axis, and stellar mass with the same precision as Doppler giant-planet surveys
  5. An estimated eccentricity distribution of a subset of planets sufficient to distinguish different dynamical evolutionary states at the 3-5 sigma level
  6. 6. Snapshot images of those stars in the survey predicted to have detectable debris disks
  7. High-SNR images of all debris disks showing planet-induced structure
  8. An automated data pipeline to process images and recover calibrated astrometry and photometry
  9. A public catalog containing all reduced images, recovered planetary properties, and detection limits

The large sample will for the first time match the statistical power of extant studies of planets using indirect techniques. GPI spectroscopy will reveal atmospheric conditions and thermal history, thereby calibrating atmosphere and accretion models. The statistical properties of the distributions will arbitrate between various formation and migration scenarios. 

Program Time usage of the GPIES Campaign

Total allocation is 890 hours over 6 semesters, starting semester 2014B

Semester

Hours 

Nights 

Night Hours 

Comments 

Scheduled 

Scheduled

2014B 

73.5

19

190

Programs GS-2014B-Q-500 and GS-2014B-Q-501

2015A

97.5

20

200

Programs GS-2015A-Q-500 and GS-2015A-Q-501

2015B

99

24

240

Programs GS-2015B-Q-500 and GS-2015B-Q-501

2016A

113.7

26

260

Continued use of 15B programs

2016B

105.9

26

260

Continued use of 15B programs

2017A

48

20

200

Continued use of 15B programs

2017B

120.5

28

280

Programs GS-2017B-Q-500 and GS-2017B-Q-501

TOTAL

658.1

160

1600

UpdatedFebruary 28th, 2018

74% progress on allocated time*

41% Effectiveness (IQ70 CC50 constraints expected 35%) **

*Progress is the percentage of the progress in completing the allocated 890h

**Percentage is the ratio of "Charged Time" to "Allocated Night hours"  

GPIES Observations in the Gemini Observatory Archive (GOA) 

The Gemini Observatory Archive contains all GPIES observations. It should be noted that observations have the same proprietary period as regular queue. Any observation that is still will only be not have any links available for download.  link to the observations can be found here: 

GS-2014B-Q-500 Data for semester 2014B

GS-2014B-Q-501 Data for semester 2014B

GS-2015A-Q-500 Data for semester 2015A

GS-2015A-Q-501 Data for semester 2015A

GS-2015B-Q-500 data from August 1st, 2015 to January 31st 2016

GS-2015B-Q-501 data from August 1st, 2015 to January 31st 2016

GS-2015B-Q-500 data from February 1st, 2016 to July 31st 2016

GS-2015B-Q-501 data from February 1st, 2016 to July 31st 2016

GS-2015B-Q-500 data from August 1st, 2016 to January 31st, 2017

GS-2015B-Q-501 data from August 1st, 2016 to January 31st, 2017

GS-2017B-Q-500 data from August 1st, 2017 to December 31st 2018

GS-2017B-Q-501 data from August 1st, 2017 to December 31st 2018

Letters of Intent for Campaign Science Proposals

Update: Titles, PIs, and PI contact information for the submitted letters of intent are available.  We encourage the development of collaborative campaign programs that will yield significant scientific results and remind proposers that participation across the Gemini Partnership is a criterion by which proposals will be evaluated.

This page is also available as a pdf document.

GPI Campaign proposals are expected to embrace a large, scientifically compelling and statistically significant investigation in the chosen science area. While GPI's primary science goal is the detection and characterization of exoplanets, its high contrast capabilities will allow significant scientific advances in such areas as circumstellar disks, stellar evolution and mass transfer, fundamental stellar astrophysics including binaries, and Solar System objects. All areas are open to campaign science proposals. Collaboration of teams from across the Gemini partnership is encouraged, and partner participation is a criterion by which campaign proposals will be evaluated.

Gemini will select the scientifically compelling proposal or proposals for scheduling. We anticipate considering programs that request from 200 to 1200 queue hours of telescope time, but this does not strictly limit the amount of time that letters of intent may suggest.

Prospective GPI Campaign Projects should submit a Letter of Intent to the Gemini Deputy Director/Head of Science by January 20, 2011. Letters should include this information:

  • Title of Project
  • Principal Investigator with full name of institution and contact information (phone and email)
  • Co-Investigators with full names of institutions
  • Broad scientific goals of the program
  • An estimate of the total amount of telescope time that will be requested and the number of semesters over which the project will run
  • A brief justification for the required time, not to exceed three pages

The primary purpose of this Letter is to give the Gemini Science Committee an indication of the level of interest in GPI Campaign time so they can make a recommendation to the Board on the total time available for GPI Campaigns. The Letters of Intent will also inform the Gemini partners of the expected lien from GPI Campaign Projects on their usual allotment of Gemini time. Please send letters of intent to Gemini Deputy Director/Head of Science, Nancy Levenson, nlevenson at gemini.edu.

The Instrument

General information about GPI is available from the instruments section of the Gemini website (copied in a separate document), and current updates on GPI can be found at the external instrument site.

Policies for GPI Campaign Projects

This page is also available as a pdf document.

The GPI Campaign Projects represent a significant investment of resources by the Investigators on the projects, by the Gemini Observatory in executing the projects and by the Gemini partnership in granting the telescope time. The following are the expected policies that will govern GPI Campaign Projects.

  1. Prospective GPI Campaign Projects should submit a Letter of Intent to Gemini by January 20, 2011. Letters should include this information:
    • Title of Project
    • Principal Investigator with full name of institution and contact information (phone and email)
    • Co-Investigators with full names of institutions
    • Broad scientific goals of the program
    • An estimate of the total amount of telescope time that will be requested and the number of semesters over which the project will run
    • A brief justification for the required time, not to exceed three pages

    The primary purpose of this Letter is to give the Gemini Science Committee an indication of the level of interest in GPI Campaign Time so they can make a recommendation to the Board on the total time available for GPI Campaign Proposals. The Letters of Intent will also inform the Gemini partners on the expected lien from GPI Campaign Projects on their usual allotment of Gemini time. Additional details about the Letters of Intent are described in a separate document.


  2. The time for GPI Campaign Science will be allocated off the top in an amount decided by the Gemini Board following a recommendation from the GSC. It is expected that all partners will contribute to the GPI campaign time in proportion to their partner share.

  3. GPI Campaign Projects are to be handled similar to normal proposals in terms of time requests. Each GPI Campaign Proposal will indicate the requested number of hours per semester. Campaign program PIs must be eligible for time on Gemini South. University of Hawaii does not have time at Gemini South at present, so they cannot apply for GPI Campaign Time through the UH host time, but they may apply through the US.

  4. A GPI Campaign TAC will assess proposals and make recommendations to the Gemini Director. The GSC will make recommendations on the size and makeup of the TAC following receipt of the Letters of Intent. The Letters will also allow the GSC to identify conflicts of interest when populating the TAC. The Campaign TAC will include representation from the International TAC. This TAC will be the basis for the GPI Campaign Working Group that will evaluate progress of the ongoing approved programs.

  5. Gemini will appoint a staff member to be the GPI Campaign Program Manager. This person will be responsible for the oversight of the successful GPI Campaign program(s) and will serve as the interface to Gemini for policy issues. Issues related to operation of the campaign programs will be handled the Head of Science Operations for Gemini South.

  6. Gemini will not provide a funding award to support GPI Campaign Science.

  7. Approved campaign targets and their observing modes will be made public. Observations using a substantially different mode or instrumental setup may be considered for target duplication in independent programs.

  8. The Call for GPI Campaign Proposals is expected to be issued on February 1, 2011, with an expected deadline of March 31, 2011, for receipt of proposals.

  9. GPI Campaign Proposals must include:
    • a discussion of the primary scientific goals of the project;
    • a description of the experimental design, including sample selection, use of GPI, scheduling requirements, calibration, etc.;
    • a statement of the time requested by semester and by science ranking band;
    • a description of data products compatible with the international virtual observatory to be delivered, and the timeline for their delivery;
    • a management plan that describes staffing and resources available to complete the science program. The management plan must also describe:
      • the expected contributions of each participant;
      • data management procedures, including access to data within the team;
      • who is responsible for submitting progress reports and final reports;
      • the process for redirecting the research agenda as discoveries are made;
      • the mechanism for routine communication among research team members.

    Additional details about the Campaign Proposals are described in separate document.


  10. Each approved GPI Campaign Project will require a “Research Collaboration Agreement” signed by all members of the team before the campaign starts. This document needs to address the following questions:
    • What are the scientific issues, goals, and anticipated outcomes or products of the collaboration?
    • When is the project considered to be complete?
    • What are the expected contributions of each participant?
    • How and by whom will data be managed? How will access to data be managed? How will long-term storage and access to data after the project is complete be handled?
    • Who will write any progress reports and final reports?
    • How will the team decide about redirecting the research agenda as discoveries are made?
    • What will be the mechanism for routine communications among members of the research team (to ensure that all appropriate members of the team are kept fully informed of relevant issues)?
    • How will the team negotiate the development of new collaborations and spin-off projects, if any?
    • How, and by whom, will personnel decisions be made? How and by whom will personnel be supervised?
    • What will be the criteria and the process for assigning authorship and credit?
    • What is the process for pursuing independent or novel results based on the campaign data?
    • How will credit be attributed to each collaborator's institution for public presentations, abstracts, and written articles?
    • How and by whom will public presentations be made?
    • How and by whom will media inquiries be handled?
    • When and how will intellectual property be handled?
    • Should one of the principals of the research team move to another institution or leave the project, how will data, and authorship, and credit be handled?
    • What is the procedure for adding new members to the research team?

    While the SDSS is a much larger collaboration, it may be useful to look at examples of their various collaboration agreements


  11. Each successful GPI Campaign Project is to submit annual progress reports to the Gemini Director. These reports should contain (at a minimum) a summary of the observing time used thus far, comments on the quality of the data and whether the data quality is sufficient to meet the scientific goals of the program, a summary of the activities of each team member, the status of reduction of the data, and detailed plans for the next year of the project. With advice from the GPI Campaign Working Group, Gemini and the GSC will assess these reports to determine if continuing campaign observations are warranted.


Public Data Readme

GPI Public Data Early Release Readme


Contributors:

GPI first light observing team: Bruce Macintosh, James Graham, Stephen Goodsell, Les Saddlemyer, Dave Palmer, Jeff Chilcote, Andrew Cardwell, Jennifer Dunn, Ramon Galvez, Gaston Gausachs, Markus Hartung, Pascale Hibon, Patrick Ingraham, Marshall Perrin, Lisa Poyneer, Carlos Quiroz, Fredrik Rantakyro, Naru Sadakuni, Dmitry Savransky, Andrew Serio, Sandrine Thomas, Kent Wallace, Schuyler Wolff

GPI data analysis team: Marshall Perrin, Jerome Maire, Patrick Ingraham, Dmitry Savransky, Christian Marois, Rob De Rosa, Jeff Chilcote, Rene Doyon, Zack Draper, Quinn Konopacky, Franck Marchis, Max Millar-Blanchaer, Jennifer Patience, Laurent Pueyo, Abhi Rajan, Jean-Baptiste Ruffio, Sandrine Thomas, Jason Wang, Kim Ward-Duong, Schuyler Wolff


Description of Targets


The targets for this data release fall into five categories:

  • Photometric/Spectroscopic standards. Most of these were observed open loop (i.e. AO control off) and unblocked by the coronagraph to measure system throughput while avoiding saturation. Some targets were observed with and without the apodizers and Lyot stops to measure the relative throughput of the coronagraph masks. The targets are from the IRTF Spex spectral library (HD 51956, HIP 30979, HD 20619), plus the white dwarf companion to HD 8049 from Zurlo et al. 2013.  

  • Astrometric Standards. Trapezium stars Theta1 Orionis A and B (compare with Close et al. 2013), and HD 1160 (compare with Nielsen et al. 2012).

  • Bright overhead test targets (but otherwise undistinguished stars).  During the first run we tested the AO system and coronagraph on a series of targets chosen primarily for brightness and position in the sky. We include these as examples of GPI coronagraphy in a range of atmospheric conditions and observing bands, but caution that (a) these were early nights and instrument performance was very much in flux as operating parameters were adjusted, and (b) the seeing was relatively poor.

  • Stars with Known Planets and/or Disks.  HD 95086 (H and K1 bands), Beta Pic (J band only), HD 10647 (J), HD 61005 (J).

  • Resolved Solar System Targets. Neptune (H band)


A subsequent data release(s) will add targets in polarimetry mode and in GPI’s non-redundant aperture masking (NRM) mode. The GPI team is still working to improve calibration of these modes and handling of some systematics before releasing these data.  


Finally, other targets have been observed but remain proprietary to the GPI team for the time being, including Beta Pic (H, K1, K2 bands) and HR 8799 (K1 and K2 bands).  



Important Cautionary Notes


The released FITS files represent the GPI instrument team’s best effort at calibrating and reducing these observations, but instrument calibration is necessarily a work in progress and incomplete. GPI is a highly complex instrument that we are still getting to know. Use your own experience and scientific judgement when analyzing and publishing data from GPI.


In particular, the stability over time of GPI’s absolute orientation with respect to the sky has not yet been characterized. Position angles should be considered uncertain to ~ 1 degree.


Every commissioning comes with surprises. For GPI these included:

  • More vibration than desired, due to the cryocoolers on the IFS. This manifests as tip-tilt and focus jitter in these data, and reduces contrast by ~ 0.3 mag for many targets. Instrument modifications in January and February 2014 are expected to mitigate this. Note also that contrast degradation is a function of angular separation.

  • Somewhat lower throughput was achieved than expected, with particularly sharp falloff beyond 2.2 microns in the K2 band. This is still being investigated. GPI’s design and optical coatings were optimized for performance at shorter wavelengths such as H band.

  • An artifact identified before commissioning—an optical ghost called the ‘seagull’ that can be seen in flat field or arc lamp images—is due to a caustic reflection inside the IFS of light from outside the field of view. A new baffle was installed in January 2014 to mitigate this.

  • The brightness ratios of the satellite spots relative to one another are variable at a level of up to a few tens of percent. This is believed to be due to an interference phenomenon between speckles and the diffracted spots. Quantitative models and calibrations are under development. Users should be cautious in assessing uncertainties when conducting photometry relative to satellite spots, and should not rely solely on any one single spot.

  • The lenslet (spaxel) pixel scale appears to be exactly as expected, 14.3±0.1 mas/lenslet. Distortion has not yet been characterized on sky; laboratory tests measured median distortion of 0.26 spaxels over the full field of view, and a correction based on these lab measurements is included with the data pipeline, which should reduce residual distortion to <0.04 spaxels.

  • Due to IFS internal flexure, the microspectra shift locations with respect to the detector, generally less than one pixel but with occasional larger shifts. Calibrations for this are still being improved. The wavelength calibration of the reduced data files should be considered uncertain by ~0.2% (~ 3 nm).  Shifts will vary from image to image depending on changes in elevation.



Data Reduction Notes


We summarize here the steps by which the raw data were reduced for this data release. Readers should also consult the GPI data pipeline documentation for additional descriptions of the individual steps in processing. As with all outputs of the GPI data pipeline, detailed reduction history and all reduction parameters are saved in FITS headers, so consult those for full details.


The data were reduced with v1.0rc1 (release candidate 1) of the GPI data reduction pipeline using the following primitives:

 

  • Flag Quicklook

  • Load wavelength calibration

  • Subtract dark background

  • Destripe science image (a)

  • Interpolate bad pixels in 2D frame

  • Update spot shifts for flexure

  • Assemble spectral datacube

  • Divide by lenslet flat field

  • Interpolate wavelength axis

  • Correct distortion

  • Measure satellite spot locations (b)

  • Measure satellite spot peak fluxes (b)


(a) - Destriping only performed on J-band closed-loop data.

(b) - Satellite spots only measured in a subset of the closed-loop data.


Sky background observations were obtained for a subset of targets,  offset by ~ 30 arcsec from the science objects. For this subset of observations, a sky cube was constructed through a median-combination of each reduced sky cube, which was then subtracted from each reduced science cube. For observations that lack contemporaneous sky data, no sky subtraction was performed in these reduced files.


Calibration files were selected either automatically or manually for the following primitives:

Load wavelength calibration -- automatic

Subtract dark background -- automatic

Interpolated bad pixels in 2D frame -- automatic

Divide by lenslet flat field -- manually (S20131212S0004_lensletflat_spec.fits)

Correct distortion -- manually (S20121210S0066-distor.fits)


The default recipe parameters were only changed in two instances; (1) when an offset was needed to align the wavecal solution with the spectra in the unprocessed 2D images, and (2) when the automatic satellite spot location algorithm failed due to low SNR on the satellite spots:


1 - Wavecal offset


For a subset of the reductions, the offset obtained from the lookup table in the ‘Update spot shifts for flexure’ primitive were not sufficient to fully correct for the flexure of the instrument. This problem manifests itself as a strong Moire pattern within each slice of the reduced data cube, which is discussed under ‘Reducing your science data’ here:


http://docs.planetimager.org/pipeline/usage/tutorial.html


For observations where the offsets obtained from the lookup table led to a poor reduction, GPItv was used to determine the correct offset to apply by visually aligning the spectra within the 2D image with the overplotted wavecal solution. This offset was then entered into the ‘manual_dx’ and ‘manual_dy’ parameters of the primitive, with the ‘method’ parameter changed to ‘manual’, and the data were re-reduced. As the expected change in the offset caused by instrument flexure as a function of target elevation was small for a given set of observations on a target (typically <0.2px), a single offset value pair was used for each sequence of a given target. This procedure was necessary for the following observations:

All Y-band

All J-band

H-band observations of Neptune

All K2-band


Improved automation for flexure compensation is under development for future versions of the data pipeline.

2 - Satellite spot finding


For a subset of closed-loop observations taken under poor seeing conditions, or for which the satellite spots are only marginally detected, the automatic spot-finding algorithm (‘Measure satellite spot locations’) fails during the reduction process. In this case, the data are initially reduced without the final two satellite spot primitives. The pixel position of the spots in the 15th frame were measured manually, and the data were re-reduced with the following modifications to the parameters in the ‘Measure satellite spot locations’ primitive:


reference_index = 15

loc_input = 1

x*, y* = [x, y pixel position of the corresponding satellite spot]


The next release of the data pipeline will include refinements to the automated spot-finding algorithm which will hopefully increase its success rate.  However, images with very low SNR in the spot locations will almost always need to be reprocessed manually to locate the spots.


Using the Satellite Spots:

The measured satellite spot locations and fluxes are written to the extension header in each FITS file, along with the derived mean star locations (keywords SATSi_j for sat spot locations, SATFi_i for sat spot fluxes, where i gives the wavelength index and j in {0-3} indexes the four spots.) Keywords PSFCENTX and PSFCENTY give the star locations;  Note that these are the mean locations across the spectral axis, but due to atmospheric differential refraction the star’s apparent position will generally vary with wavelength. (These data were all obtained prior to GPI’s atmospheric dispersion corrector being commissioned for use, so ADR is uncompensated).  The wavelength dependent position may be computed from the SATSi_j keywords and used to align the wavelength channels.


The satellite spots can also be used for photometry relative to the central star. The satellite spot intrinsic brightness ratios have been measured in the lab for each apodizer (one per filter). See the file config/apodizer_spec.txt included with the data pipeline.  Datacubes may be calibrated into physical flux units using the “Calibrate Photometric Flux” primitive in the data pipeline.