Gemini Detects Something "Cool" in Our Neighborhood:  

Closest Known Brown Dwarf has a Companion

IMAGES

For more information, refer to the science announcement.

Original Gemini South detection image obtained on August 18, 2003 with PHOENIX using narrow-band filter within the J-band. This image is 4x4 arc-seconds across and was obtained without adaptive optics.

Credit: "Gemini Observatory/PHOENIX Image"

Gemini South/PHOENIX image obtained using a narrow-band filter within the K-band and revealing the deep methane absorption and cool temperature of the companion by its invisibility at these wavelengths. This image is 4x4 arc-seconds across and was obtained without adaptive optics.

Credit: "Gemini Observatory/PHOENIX Image"

Gemini South Mulit-Object Spectrograph (GMOS-S) z-band image obtained on September 2, 2003. This image is 4x4 arc-seconds across and was obtained without adaptive optics.

Credit: "Gemini Observatory Image"


Artist conception of the Epsilon Indi system (without inset)
An artist's conception of the Epsilon Indi system showing Epsilon Indi and the brown-dwarf binary companions. Due to the perspective of the brown dwarf companions, the relative sizes are not represented in this illustration. Full resolution versions of this image (with and without text) are available here.

Artwork by Jon Lomberg. Credit: "Gemini Observatory Illustration"


Naked-eye locator map for Epsilon Indi
Naked-eye locator map for Epsilon Indi showing nearby bright stars/constellations visible in the Southern Hemisphere. A full resolution version of this image is available here (17.8 MB).

Artwork by Jon Lomberg. Credit: "Gemini Observatory Illustration"