Change page style: 

Gemini Uncovers 'Lost City' of Stars

August 10, 2005

En Español - Versión adaptada en Chile

For Immediate Release

August 10, 2005

Media Contacts:

Science Contacts:

  • Joss Bland-Hawthorn
    Anglo-Australian Observatory

    Sydney, Australia
    +61-2-9372-4851(Office)
    +61-404-858-054 (Cell)
    jbh@aaoepp.aao.gov.au
  • Bruce Draine
    Princeton University
    (609) 258-3810 (Office)
    (609) 731-1036 (Cell)
    draine@astro.princeton.edu
  • Ken Freeman
    Australian National University

    Canberra, Australia
    +61-2-6125-0264 (Office)
    +61-402-134-289(Cell)
    kcf@mso.anu.edu.au

Like archaeologists unearthing a 'lost city,' astronomers using the 8-meter Gemini South telescope have revealed that the galaxy NGC 300 has a large, faint extended disk made of ancient stars, enlarging the known diameter of the galaxy by a factor of two or more.

The finding also implies that our own Milky Way Galaxy could be much larger than current textbooks say. Scientists will also need to explain the mystery of how galaxies like NGC 300 can form with stars so far from their centers.

The research, by an Australian and American team of scientists was just published in the August 10, 2005 issue of the Astrophysical Journal.

The team used the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on the Gemini South telescope in Chile, and were able to clearly resolve extremely faint stars in the disk up to 47,000 light-years from the galaxy’s center—double the previously known radius of the disk. To detect these stars, images were obtained that went more than ten times ‘deeper’ than any previous images of this galaxy (Figure 1).

Background - Anglo-Australian Observatory, David Malin/Inset - Gemini Observatory

Figure 1. A wide-field view of NGC 300 as obtained by the Anglo-Australian Observatory (AAO) by David Malin is paired with extremely deep Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) images (inset). The AAO image is cropped to the approximate minimum extent of the outer disk of faint stars as imaged by Gemini South in the "exploded" inset.  The Gemini images reveal individual stars down to about magnitude 27 (3 sigma) in two r-band images that each have a combined exposure/integration of 8,100 seconds (2.25 hours).  The Gemini images were obtained under excellent conditions that were necessary to obtain such deep images; image quality is ~ 0.6" FWHM.  Gemini inset field is approximately 5.5' x 10.5'. (The small dark areas in the Gemini images are shadows from instrument "guide-probes.")

“A few billion years ago the outskirts of NGC 300 were brightly lit suburbs that would have shown up as clearly as its inner metropolis,” said the paper’s lead author, Professor Joss Bland-Hawthorn of the Anglo-Australian Observatory in Sydney, Australia. “But the suburbs have dimmed with time, and are now inhabited only by faint, old stars—stars that need large telescopes such as Gemini South to detect them.”

The finding has profound implications for our own galaxy since most current estimates put the size of our Milky Way at about 100,000 light-years or about the size now estimated for NGC 300. “However, the galaxy is much more massive and brighter than NGC 300 so on this basis, our galaxy is also probably much larger than we previously thought—perhaps as much as 200,000 light-years across,” said Bland-Hawthorn.

The Galaxy That Keeps On Keeping On!

Adding to these compelling findings is the fact that the team found no evidence for truncating, or an abrupt ‘cutting-off' of the star population as seen in many galaxies further from the central regions.

Team member Professor Bruce Draine of Princeton University explains: "It's hard to understand how such an extensive stellar disk that falls off so smoothly in density could have formed — this is really a huge surprise to us. Because it takes an incredibly long time to evenly disperse stars from a galaxy's central disk to these extreme distances, it seems more likely that we are seeing the results of star formation that took place long ago, perhaps as much as ten billion years ago."

“We now realize that there are distinctly different types of galaxy disks,” said team member Professor Ken Freeman of the Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the Australian National University. “Probably most galaxies are truncated—the density of stars in the disk drops off sharply. But NGC 300 just seems to go on forever. The density of stars in the disk falls off very smoothly and gradually.”

The observers traced NGC 300’s disk out to the point where the surface density of stars was equivalent to a one-thousandth of a sun per square light-year. “This is the most extended and diffuse population of stars ever seen,” said Bland-Hawthorn.

NGC 300 is a spiral member of the Sculptor group of galaxies, the closest extragalactic cluster to us, and is about 6.1 million light-years away. Most of its stars lie in a fairly flat disk making it appear to be a very normal spiral galaxy like our Milky Way. NGC 300 is the first galaxy outside of our Local Group to be studied to this depth. There have only been two others studied to such faint levels, the Andromeda galaxy and its neighbor M33, both in our Local Group (see adjacent background information box).

The researchers have been granted more time on Gemini South to determine exactly what kind of stars they are seeing in the outskirts of NGC 300, and to make similar studies of other galaxies.

“We still have a lot to learn about how galaxies like ours formed,” said Bland-Hawthorn. “Our next Gemini observations, that we have planned for later this year, should provide even more important clues and hopefully even more surprises!”

Podcasts

Subscribe to our podcast rss feed


How to use Gemini Observatory's podcast with iTunes:

  1. Open iTunes
  2. Select Menu > Advanced > Subscribe to Podcast
  3. Enter the following in the url field: http://www.gemini.edu/services/rss/podcasts.xml



Video

A simulation showing the formation and evolution of a 'disk galaxy' like our own Milky Way Galaxy.

Credit: Jesper Sommer-Larsen, Martin Goetz and Laura Portinari (Theoretical Astrophysics Center, Copenhagen), and Martin Laursen (Copenhagen Observatory).

QuickTime Video (6 MB)

Audio

Joss Bland-Hawthorn discusses NGC 300 (all files in MP3 format)

  1. Why the team chose to study NGC 300 (1:46 | 1.6 MB)
  2. The approach they took: counting the stars. (1:24 | 1.3MB)
  3. Observing with Gemini. The results were surprising. (2:23 | 2.2 MB)
  4. What do we know about how disks form? (2:21 | 2.1 MB)
  5. What the finding suggests (2:09 | 2MB)

Images

All-Sky Gemini South Sunset

Full-Resolution TIFF (24 MB)

For a variety of publication-quality images of the Gemini telescopes visit the Gemini Image Gallery

NGC 300 - Gemini/AAO Comparison

Full-Resolution TIFF (12.5 MB)

A wide-field view of NGC 300 as obtained by the Anglo-Australian Observatory (AAO) by David Malin is paired with extremely deep Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) images (inset).  The Gemini images reveal individual stars down to about magnitude 27 (3 sigma) in two r-band images that each have a combined exposure/integration of 8,100 seconds (2.25 hours).  The Gemini images were obtained under excellent conditions that were necessary to obtain such deep images; image quality is ~ 0.6" FWHM.  Gemini inset field is approximately 5.5' x 10.5'. (The small dark areas in the Gemini images are shadows from instrument "guide-probes.")

Note: Gemini inset image avaialble below...

Image Credit: Anglo-Australian Observatory - David Malin/Gemini Observatory

NGC 300 GMOS Sub-field

Full-Resolution TIFF (2.3 MB)

Gemini GMOS deep-field of NGC 300 revealing individual stars down to about magnitude 27 (3 sigma) in two r-band images that each have a combined exposure/integration of 8,100 seconds (2.25 hours).  Close examination also reveals that this image contains thousands of individual distant galaxies well beyond NGC 300. The Gemini images were obtained under excellent conditions that were necessary to obtain such deep images; image quality is ~ 0.6" FWHM.  Gemini inset field is approximately 5.5' x 10.5'. (The small dark areas in the Gemini images are shadows from instrument "guide-probes.")

Image Credit: Gemini Observatory 

Professor Ken Freeman of the Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the Australian National University in Canberra, Australia.

Full-Resolution JPEG (221 kb)

 

Professor Bruce Draine of Princeton University in Princeton NJ, USA.

Full-Resolution JPEG (269 kb)

Professor Joss Bland-Hawthorn of the Anglo-Australian Observatory in Sydney Australia.

Full-Resolution JPEG (1.6 MB)

Gemini Descubre 'Ciudad Perdida' de Estrellas

Contactos de Prensa:

  • Peter Michaud
    Gemini Observatory, Hilo HI

    (808) 974-2510 (Office)
    (808) 937-0845 (Cell)
    pmichaud@gemini.edu
  • Ma. Antonieta García Ureta
    Gemini Observatory, La Serena, Chile

    56-51-205628 (Oficina)
    09-9182858 (cel)
    agarcia@gemini.edu
  • Helen Sim
    Anglo-Australian Observatory
    +61-2-9372-4251 (Office)
    +61-419-635-905 (Cell)
    Helen.Sim@aaoepp.aao.gov.au

Contacto Científicos:

  • Joss Bland-Hawthorn
    Anglo-Australian Observatory

    Sydney, Australia
    +61-2-9372-4851(Office)
    +61-404-858-054 (Cell)
    jbh@aaoepp.aao.gov.au
  • Bruce Draine
    Princeton University
    (609) 258-3810 (Office)
    (609) 731-1036 (Cell)
    draine@astro.princeton.edu
  • Ken Freeman
    Australian National University

    Canberra, Australia
    +61-2-6125-0264 (Office)
    +61-402-134-289(Cell)
    kcf@mso.anu.edu.au

Igual que si los arqueólogos desenterraran una “Ciudad Perdida”, algunos astrónomos tras utilizar el telescopio de 8 metros de Gemini Sur han revelado que la Galaxia NGC 300 tiene un gran disco, más bien opaco, constituído de estrellas ancianas, que aumentan el diámetro conocido de la galaxia en un factor de dos o más.

Este descubrimiento también implica que nuestra propia Galaxia - la Vía Láctea - podría ser más grande de lo que explican los textos en la actualidad. Los científicos también necesitarán explicar el misterio de cómo galaxias como la NGC 300 pueden formarse con estrellas tan lejanas de sus centros.

La investigación llevada a cabo por un equipo Australiano y Norteamericano de científicos fue recientemente publicado en la edición del 10 de agosto del 2005 del Astrophysical Journal.

Utilizando el Espectrógrafo Multi Objetivo de Gemini (GMOS) instalado en el telescopio de Gemini Sur, en Vicuña, Chile, este equipo fue capaz de descubrir claramente estrellas extremadamente opacas en el disco, distantes hasta 47 mil años luz del centro de la galaxia – el doble del radio previamente conocido del disco. Para detectar estas estrellas se obtuvieron imágenes 10 veces más “profundas” que cualquier otra imagen previa de esta galaxia. (Figura 1).

Parte de atrás- Observatorio Anglo Australiano, David Malin/Inserto – Observatorio Gemini

Figura 1. Una vista con amplitud de campo de la NGC 300 obtenida por David Marlin del Observatorio Anglo Australiano (AAO) es comparada con imágenes estremadamente profundas del Espectrógrafo Multi Objetivo de Gemini (GMOS) (en el inserto). La imagen de AAO está cortada al mínimo aproximado del disco externo de estrellas opacas como muestra la imagen de Gemini Sur en el inserto "ampliado". Las imágenes de Gemini revelan estrellas individuales de magnitud aproximada 27 (3 sigma) en dos imágenes de bandas r ambas con una exposición combinada de 8,100 segundos (2.25 horas). Las imágenes de Gemini fueron obtenidas bajo condiciones excelentes que fueron necesarias para obtener tales profundidades de campo; la calidad de imagen es ~ 0.6" FWHM. El Inserto de campo de Gemini es de aproximadamente 5.5' x 10.5'. (Las partes oscuras pequeñas en las imágenes de Gemini son sombras de instrumentos “guías”)

Hace unos pocos billones de años atrás los bordes de la NGC 300 eran suburbios iluminados muy brillantes que se hubieran mostrado tan claros como su metrópolis interna,” dijo el autor responsable del paper , el Profesor Joss Bland-Hawthorn del Observatorio Anglo Australiano en Sydney, Australia. “pero los suburbios se han opacado con el tiempo, y ahora están habitados sólo por estrellas viejas sin brillo - estrellas que necesitan telescopios grandes como el de Gemini Sur, para poder ser detectadas”

Este descubrimiento tiene profundas implicancias para nuestra propia galaxia ya que la mayoría de las estimaciones más recientes señalan que el tamaño de la Vía Láctea es de 100 mil años luz o aproximadamente del tamaño ahora reestimado de la NGC 300. “De todas maneras, la galaxia es mucho más masiva y brillante que la NGC 300 entonces sobre estas bases, es probable que nuestra galaxia también sea mucho más grande de lo que pensamos en un principio—quizás mida a lo largo hasta 200 mil años luz,” estimó Bland-Hawthorn.

La Galaxia Sin Fin!

Se suman a estos descubrimientos extraordinarios, el hecho que el equipo no encontró evidencia de truncado, o de algún corte abrupto de la población de estrellas como se ve en muchas galaxias más lejanas de las regiones centrales.

El integrante del equipo científico, Profesor Bruce Draine de la Universidad de Princeton explica: "Es difícil entender cómo pudo formarse un disco estelar de esa magnitud con tan suave densidad – esto realmente es una gran sorpresa para nosotros. Ya que toma una cantidad increíble de tiempo el dispersar de manera pareja las estrellas desde el disco central de la galaxia hasta estas distancias estremas, parece más bien que estamos viendo los resultados de una formación estelar que se llevó a cabo hace mucho tiempo, quizás hace al menos 10 billones de años atrás."

“Ahora nos hemos dado cuenta que existen distintivamente diferentes tipos de discos de galaxias” señaló el miembro del equipo Profesor Ken Freeman de la Escuela de Investigación de Astronomía en la Universidad Nacional de Australia. “Probablemente la mayoría de las galaxias están truncadas—la densidad de las estrellas en el disco cae dramáticamente. Pero la NGC 300 simplemente parece que sigue eternamente. La densidad de estrellas en el disco cae muy suavemente y de manera gradual.”

Los observadores rastrearon el disco de la NGC 300 hasta el punto donde la densidad de la superficie de las estrellas era equivalente a una en un mil de un sol por año luz al cuadrado. “Esta es la población estelar más extendida y difusa que hayamos visto alguna vez” señaló Bland-Hawthorn.

La NGC 300 es una integrante espiral del grupo de galaxias Sculptor, los cúmulos extragalácticos más cercanos a nosotros y está a alrededor de 6.1 millones de años luz de distancia. La mayoría de sus estrellas se ubycan en un disco más bien plano haciendo que parezca una galaxia espiral muy normal como nuestra Vía Láctea. La NGC 300 es la primera galaxia fuera de nuestro Grupo Local en ser estudiada con esta profundidad, sólo se han llevado a cabo otros dos estudios en niveles tan opacos, la galaxia Andromeda y su vecina M33, ambas en nuestro Grupo Local (ver cuadro de información adyacente).

A estos investigadores se les ha otorgado más tiempo en Gemini Sur para determinar exactamente qué tipo de estrellas están mirando en los bordes de la NGC 300, y para hacer estudios similares de otras galaxias.

“Todavía nos queda mucho que aprender acerca de cómo se formaron las galaxias similares a la nuestra” dijo Bland-Hawthorn. “Nuestras próximas observaciones en Gemini, que hemos planificado para este año, debieran brindarnos pistas incluso más importantes y mayores sorpresas aún!”

{mospagebreak}

Cielo completo al Atardecer en Gemini Sur

Alta Resolución TIFF (24 MB)

Para una variedad de imagenes de calidad de publicación de los telescopios de Gemini visite Gemini Image Gallery

NGC 300 - Gemini/Comparación AAO

Alta Resolución (12.5 MB)

Una vista con amplitud de campo de la NGC 300 obtenida en el Observatorio Anglo-Australiano (AAO) por David Malin es comparada con imagines de extrema profundidad obtenidas por GMOS el Espectrógrafo Multi-Objeto de Gemini (inserto). Las imágenes de Gemini revelan estrellas individuals hasta en magnitud 27 (3 sigma) en imagines de dos bandas r que tienen combinada exposición/ integración de 8,100 segundos (2.25 horas). Estas imeagenes de Gemini fueron obtenidas bajo excelentes condiciones que fueron necesarias para obtener esta profundidad de imagen; la calidad de imagen es ~ 0.6" FWHM. El Inserto de campo de Gemini es de aproximadamente 5.5' x 10.5'. (Las partes oscuras pequeñas en las imágenes de Gemini son sombras de instrumentos “guías”) Nota: El inserto de Gemini está disponible acá

Crédito de Imagen: Anglo-Australian Observatory - David Malin/Gemini Observatory

NGC 300 GMOS Sub-campo

Alta-Resolución TIFF (2.3 MB)

Las imágenes del GMOS de la NGC 300 revelan estrellas individuales de magnitud aproximada 27 (3 sigma) en dos imágenes de bandas r ambas con una exposición combinada de 8,100 segundos (2.25 horas).Examinaciones cercanas también revelan que esta imagen contiene miles de galaxias individuales distantes más allá de la NGC 300 Estas imeagenes de Gemini fueron obtenidas bajo excelentes condiciones que fueron necesarias para obtener esta profundidad de imagen; la calidad de imagen es ~ 0.6" FWHM. El Inserto de campo de Gemini es de aproximadamente 5.5' x 10.5'. (Las partes oscuras pequeñas en las imágenes de Gemini son sombras de instrumentos “guías”).

Crédito de Imagen: Observatorio Gemini

Profesor Ken Freeman de la Escuela de investigación dde Astronomía y Astrofísica en la Australian National University en Canberra, Australia.

Alta-Resolución JPEG (221 kb)

 

Professor Bruce Draine of Princeton University in Princeton NJ, USA.

Alta-Resolución JPEG (269 kb)

Professor Joss Bland-Hawthorn del Anglo-Australian Observatory en Sydney Australia.

Alta-Resolución JPEG (1.6 MB)