Change page style: 

Status and Availability

Update November 20, 2014

The trouble shooting have had success of the bias drift issue and we are now in a situation that GPI will be back in queue. The queue window starts Friday November 21st to Monday November 24th.

The bias drift was caused by a poor cooling flow inside the Electronics cabinet for the OIWFS. The short term fix was to install an additional fan, and the long term is looking into better temperature control/cooling of the particular electronics boards.

Update November 18, 2014

It was found at the beginning of the last night of the GPIES Campaign (November 12th) that the bias drifts in the AOWFS were much higher than normal and impeding observation with GPI. Since then we have been investigating the issue and it is most probably related to cooling flow issues inside the electronics cabinet for the AOWFS.

As soon as we have news the status will be updated and we will then focus on advancing on the GPI queue programs. We recommend any PI's that have targets that have set and/or close to setting to take contact with the Head of Science Operations (Rene Rutten rrutten@gemini.edu) to get approval for adding new targets that have the same science goal as the original targets and thus allowing the completion of their science goals.

Update November 12, 2014

The exposure times have been modified and updated on http://www.gemini.edu/sciops/instruments/gpi/instrument-performance/exposure-times. We will update the exposure times in the programs in the queue for 2014B, so no intervention is needed from the PI's.

Update November 5, 2014

GPI grows in popularity among the Gemini community in the 2015A semester.

  • GPI proposals consisted of 16% of the total time requested at Gemini South, up by 5% from last semester.

Update November 4, 2014

On behalf of the GPI data analysis team I am pleased to announce the release of GPI Data Reduction Pipeline version 1.2. Available now from http://docs.planetimager.org/pipeline/. This release provides updates, bug fixes, improved documentation, and new functionality for 2014B and beyond. In particular:

  • Improved primitives for flexure correction, ADR compensation, photometric calibration, wavelength calibration, satellite spot photometry and astrometry, and more
  • Updated instrument characterization for pixel scale, rotation angle, and photometric zero points
  • Recipe generation enhancements and substantial speedups to the Data Parser
  • Documentation improvements including new tutorials on reducing your own GPI data and spectrophotometric calibration
  • and a whole bunch more.

Detailed release notes and credit to contributors are available at http://docs.planetimager.org/pipeline/installation/relnotes.html

Update November 3, 2014

An email was sent out yesterday to the GPI PI's informing them about the progress of GPI programs in the queue.

  • You may have seen that we have not been observing your GPI programs, this is not due to technical problems and/or problems with your observations. We have had GPI scheduled in queue blocks this semester, unfortunately the weather has not been cooperative with the expected conditions to observe with GPI. We are continuing with your programs in the queue and we hope that the weather will improve and we can progress with the GPI queue programs.

Update November 2, 2014

Summary of accepted programs in 2014B for GPI.

  • A total of 72h of Band 1 and Band programs was accepted in 2014B.
  • The time is spread over 12 programs of which 6 are Band 1 programs and 6 are Band 2. Programs are spread over most of the international partners, 2 Australian, 2 Canadian, 4 Chilean and 4 US programs.
  • The GPI proposals made up 11% of the total requested time and the over subscription factor for GPI was 3.7

Update May 12, 2014

  • Detailed instructions on how to obtain the GPI Pipeline and baseline Calibration files from the GSA are available here.

Update May 7, 2014

Update May 5, 2014

 

 

Update May 2, 2014

 

  • During the 6 nights dedicated to the GPI Early Science run, 4 nights were granted with photometric and clear sky with a very good seeing. The two last nights were unfortunately plagued with bad weather : clouds, winds and extremely poor seeing.
  • Out of the 16 accepted programs for the GPI Early Science run, 13 where completed, 1 partially completed, 1 attempted and 1 not observed. 
  • The run was in general very successful and the Gemini GPI team is satisfied by the GPI performance during this observing run.

 

 

Update March 24, 2014

  • The Early Science programs have been selected and the PI's contacted and they now can work on the Phase II for the observations. 
  • The second commissioning run started on March 20th and has been a great success, and it is expected that the remaining two nights will be working as well. The run has shown that the ADC is working and it is expected that we can use the ADC as part of the standard operations. Major improvements to the OIWFS control loops have been implemented and work is in progress on analysing the data. The polarization modes have been used frequently to obtain more performance data, high contrast data with the standard coronography and direct imaging data has also been taken. NRM observations has also been taken, which will allow performance evaluations of this mode in time for the 15A CfP. 
  • It is planned that April 20th to 26th will be the allocated nights for the Early Science run. 
  • Currently the time estimates in the OT is wrong as it does not properly calculate the times needed to take an exposure. Please check the Overheads node for more information. 

 

Update February 25, 2014

There has been a lot of activity on the GPI side these last few weeks.

 

  • GPI Early Science has been opened with a deadline of February 28th, 2014
  • WWW pages has seen a major overhaul:
    • Instrument Performance pages has seen a major update to all subsection
    • The Campaign target list has been updated
    • The public data realease now has more than a dozen targets that can be downloaded. The data sets include both raw and reduced data.
  • The remediation was a success, it included:
    • Replacement of two motors (pupil and prism/disperser slide)
    • Installation of an IFS baffle that removed the stray light seen on sky flats and GCAL flats
    • Software fixes that among other things decreased the overheads in readouts by 4 seconds
    • Most importantly a synchronization of the CCR's that decreased the measured vibrations by at least a factor of two

Update September 13, 2013

GPI is currently in the Acceptance testing stage, which is expected to conclude with the Acceptance review in late May 2013. Assuming the current schedule, the instrument will be delivered to Gemini South in middle 2013. GPI will be used to carry out large Campaign programmes as well as standard science programmes via the TAC system. It is expected that the earliest science observing will be in semester 2014A pending results from Acceptance Testing and Commissioning.

The approved GPI campaign program is led by Bruce Macintosh (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) and will conduct a comprehensive survey to yield a robust census of extrasolar giant planets, for more information visit this link.

Update August 16, 2011

GPI is currently under development. Assuming the current schedule, the instrument will be delivered to Gemini South in middle 2012. GPI will be used to carry out large Campaign programmes as well as standard science programmes via the TAC system. It is expected that the earliest science observing will be in semester 2013A pending results from Acceptance Testing and Commissioning.

The approved GPI campaign program is led by Bruce Macintosh (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) and will conduct a comprehensive survey to yield a robust census of extrasolar giant planets, for more information visit this link.

The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) traveled from the University of California Santa Cruz to Gemini South and is now on the summit of Cerro Pachón. GPI remained in crates during the busy Gemini South maintenance shutdown. Unpacking just began, and GPI was reassembled in the instrument lab on August 29. If everything checks out successfully, GPI will be mounted on the telescope at the very end of October, with first light on sky sometime during November. Because no on-sky commissioning has been completed yet, the instrument will not be part of the regular 2014A call for proposals. However, we are aiming to conduct some early science observations, selected through an open call to the community, during the semester. More details will be provided as the instrument commissioning proceeds.

Update February 27, 2013

GPI testing at Cerro Pachon have reached a major milestone yesterday by taking images of the calibration light source with the science camera. The final contrast curve is very similar to those obtained in Santa Cruz. Today we ran the Speckle Nulling routine giving an improvement of a factor 2 to 3 . Progress have been according to the telescope integration plan and it is expected that GPI will go onto the flexure rig in the last week of September.